Instructors at Large

Dan Gheno’s “Practical Perspective”

  • February 5, 2016


“Practical Perspective” is Dan Gheno’s new article in the Winter 2016 issue of Drawing Magazine, on newsstands next week. Here’s a preview of the drawings that accompany the piece.

IMG_2254

Dan Gheno, Aviva Over Shoulder, 2005.
Colored pencil and white chalk on toned paper, 8 x 6 in.

001Pondering-Lean-low-res(1)

Dan Gheno, “Pondering Lean, 2015.
Colored pencil, 24 x 18 in.

002-65low res(1)

Dan Gheno, Cubic Forms, 2015. Grease pencil, 24 x 18 in.

one leg llow res

Dan Gheno, On One Leg, 2015.
Charcoal, 18 x 10 in.

005Gheno 063b

Dan Gheno, Fading Figure, 2012.
Oil sanguine, 24 x 18 in.

00400002_Panorama1low-res

Dan Gheno, Swooping Figure, 2005. Oil sanguine, 18 x 24 in.

002drwaPanorama1

Dan Gheno, Michael Seated, 2014.
Colored pencil and white chalk on toned paper, 24 x 18 in.

003drwn_Panorama1low-res

Dan Gheno, William Preston, Actor, ca. mid-1990s.
Charcoal and white chalk on toned paper, 24 x 18 in.

On-One-Arm

Dan Gheno, On One Arm, 2015. Colored pencil, 8 x10 in.

drwo_Panorama1

Dan Gheno, Receding Leg, 2015.
Colored pencil and white charcoal on toned paper, 24 x 18 in.

Contorted Man 1low res

Dan Gheno, Contorted Man, 2015. Ballpoint pen, 8 x 10 in.

001-42

Dan Gheno, Arms Clasped, 2015. Colored pencil, 18 x 24.

001-5

Dan Gheno, Male Figure Reaching Across Floor, 2015. Charcoal, 11 x 17 in.

Ellen Eagle’s Upcoming Projects

  • February 4, 2016


Ellen Eagle will be giving a talk about her portraits at Hampden Sydney College, in Virginia, on March 23, 2016. In June she’ll be giving a five-day workshop, “Portrait Painting in Pastel” at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (Philadelphia). Then, in July, she’ll be teaching a “Portraiture in Pastel” workshop at the Gage Academy of Art (Seattle, WA). In addition, Pratique des Arts Publishers has just issued 40 maitres du pastel le livre 2016, which includes an interview with Eagle.

Ellen Eagle, Self-Portrait, 2016. Pastel on pumice, 9 x 7½ in.

Ellen Eagle, Self-Portrait, 2016. Pastel on pumice, 9 x 7½ in.

Ephraim Rubenstein’s Two-Person Show

  • February 4, 2016


Ephraim Rubenstein, Agamemnon, Sofa I. graphite, wax, charcoal, ink, Conté pastel, and Nu-pastel on paper. 40 x 60 in.

Ephraim Rubenstein, Agamemnon, Sofa III.
Graphite, wax, charcoal, ink, Conté pastel, and Nu-pastel on paper. 40 x 60 in.

This past week, my colleague David Dodge Lewis and I were invited to show our drawings together at the Gray Gallery, East Carolina University, in Greenville, North Carolina. The exhibition, The Quickening Image: The Wax-Resist Drawings of David Dodge Lewis and Ephraim Rubenstein / A Twenty Year Collaboration, opened on January 21, 2016 and will be on view through February 19, 2016.

David and I have worked together for over twenty years developing a technique for large-scale black and white mixed media drawing called “wax-resist” drawing. It uses wax as a stop-out for subsequent ink and aqua-suspended charcoal washes. The technique is complex and powerful. It utilizes both wet and dry materials; graphite, wax, ink, charcoal, conté, pastel, salt, etc. It has the ability to be used very abstractly with all sorts of wonderful effects, as well as in the service of rendering and creating illusions. All in all, it is an amazing process, very new and little known, and we have come up with some striking drawings as a result. We used the word quickening in the title to foreground the sense of life, liveliness, and movement that the process has allowed us to impart to our subjects.

Capitol Columns 4(1)

David Dodge Lewis, Capitol Columns 4.
Graphite, wax, charcoal, ink, Conté, pastel, and Nu-pastel on paper,
40 x 26 in.

CathedralGargoyles_II(1)

Ephraim Rubenstein, Gargoyles II.
Graphite, wax, charcoal, ink, Conté, pastel, and Nu-pastel on paper,
50 x 38 in.

Barnacle 14(1)

David Dodge Lewis, Barnacles 14.
Graphite, wax, charcoal, ink, Conté, pastel, and Nu-pastel on paper,
50 x 38 in.

Installation3 copy(1)
Installation1 copy(1)
DR_Cover_Sum15_v2 copy 2(2)

 

The Quickening Image tells several stories. First, it is the story of a radically new drawing technique: It incorporates both wet and dry materials, as well as both linear and painterly elements. It derives its power from juxtaposing and resolving many contradictory tendencies: drawing/painting; wet/dry; careful/spontaneous; planned/accidental.

The Quickening Image also tells the story of a number of historically marginalized tendencies now given center stage: It is drawing, but on the scale of, and with the impact of, painting; it is grand work, but in black and white rather than in color; it is on paper rather than canvas; and for drawings that are so animated, its subjects are often inanimate objects.

Third, it is the story of a collaboration. David Lewis was aware that the English sculptor Henry Moore used wax as a resist for ink washes in his sketchbooks to quickly develop images at a small scale. David began using paraffin wax himself in large-scale works for exhibition in the mid-1980s. By the early 1990s Lewis was offering workshops in his wax-resist process, including ones at the University of Richmond, where I first observed it.  With David’s help, I spent the next twenty years adapting the process to exploit its potential for his own vision.

Finally, it tells the story of a friendship. When artists were members of guilds and often worked collectively, there was a continual transference of information, both technical and aesthetic. Later on, artists became much more isolated, and it became rarer for artists to learn from each other. In order to do so successfully, there has to be a level of mutual trust and respect that is unusual in our time. I have been continually amazed at how open and generous David has always been with his time and knowledge, and I have, in turn, shared this process with my own colleagues and students in New York.

After ending at the Washington County Museum of Art, the exhibition traveled to the Longwood Center for the Visual Arts in Farmville, Va. where it was on view from June 20, 2015 to November 22, 2015. After closing at East Carolina University, the exhibition will travel to the Evansville Museum of Art and Science in Evansville, Indiana, where it will run from December 11, 2016 to February 5, 2017. Subsequently, it will be exhibited at View Art Center in the Summer of 2017.

We have built a website for The Quickening Image, which gives information about the exhibition, as well as a catalog of images.

Foss’s Upcoming Show at the Century

  • February 3, 2016


Cornelia Foss’s solo exhibition, Large & Small, comprising both older and more recent work, opens at the Century Association (7 West 43rd Street) on March 1, 2016. Open to all, the exhibition will continue for three weeks.

Untitled portrait by Cornelia Foss

Untitled portrait by Cornelia Foss

Two Must-Read Articles by Pat Lipsky

  • February 2, 2016


Ever wonder why the art world loves men? Or, what if women’s art was all that hung in a major museum? Pat Lipsky has written two incisive articles (October 12 and January 26) under the title The Shoes Under the Art World for the online publication The Awl.

Lavinia Fontana, Portrait of Ginevra Aldrovandi Hercolani, ca. 1595. Oil on canavs, 45¼ x 37⅜ in. The Walters Art Museum.

Lavinia Fontana, Portrait of Ginevra Aldrovandi Hercolani, ca. 1595. Oil on canavs, 45¼ x 37⅜ in. The Walters Art Museum.