Instructors at Large

Neffson in Greenwich and Bilbao

  • September 23, 2014


Robert Neffson, 57th and 5th Ave.  Oil, 56 x 79 in.

Robert Neffson, 57th and 5th Ave. Oil, 56 x 79 in.

Robert Neffson will deliver a talk with a slideshow of his work at the Seven Bridges Foundation (Greenwich, CT) this Saturday, September 27, at 2 p.m. Next month, his paintings will be included in Hyperrealism, 1967–2013 in the BBK Gallery at the Museo de Bellas Artes (Bilbao, Spain). The show opens October 7, 2014 and continues through January 19, 2015.

Robert Neffson, The Metropolitan, undated.   Oil, 62 x 98 in.

Robert Neffson, The Metropolitan. Oil, 62 x 98 in.

Deborah Winiarski for ProWax Journal

  • September 23, 2014


Lisa Zukowski, Constant Cravings, 2012. Encaustic monotype on paper, 72 x 72 in.

Lisa Zukowski, Constant Cravings, 2012. Encaustic monotype on paper, 72 x 72 in.

Deborah Winiarski is now Featured Artworks Editor for ProWax Journal, a quarterly online publication for professional artists working in the medium of encaustic.
The Pull of Paper” is her first contribution.

Helen Dannelly, White Gray Cluster, 2013. Encaustic and cone coffee filters, 11 x 9 x 4 in.

Helen Dannelly, White Gray Cluster, 2013. Encaustic and cone coffee filters, 11 x 9 x 4 in.

Hatching—Technique and Unique Calligraphy

  • September 22, 2014


Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1888. Reed and quill pens and brown ink and black chalk, 12 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1888. Reed and quill pens and brown ink and black chalk, 12 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

“To speak of great drawing is, by implication, to refer to the art of hatching,” writes Jerry N. Weiss. “It’s a technique born of a practical consideration: how best to translate three-dimensional imagery to paper.” In the Fall 2014 issue of Drawing, Weiss reviews Hatched: Creating Form with Line, an exhibition of twenty-two Old Master drawings at the J. Paul Getty Museum this summer (preview PDF here).

Frans Crabbe van Espleghem, Esther Before Ahasuerus, ca. 1525. Pen-and-dark-brown-ink with touches of gray-brown wash over black chalk, 9 5/16 x 7 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

Frans Crabbe van Espleghem, Esther Before Ahasuerus, ca. 1525. Pen-and-dark-brown-ink with touches of gray-brown wash over black chalk, 9 5/16 x 7 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

An Interview with Wendy Shalen

  • September 19, 2014


Wendy Shalen discusses her recent show Family Matters and describes her use of a wide range of media in this half-hour conversation with G.G. Kopilak, host of the program “Pleasantville Connects to Visual Arts.”

Weiss on Eugene Speicher

  • September 18, 2014


Eugene Speicher, Portrait of a French Girl (Jeanne Balzac), ca. 1924. Oil on canvas, 40 x 36½ in. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum Permanent Collection. Gift of E.G. Jarman, Jr.

Eugene Speicher, Portrait of a French Girl (Jeanne Balzac), ca. 1924. Oil on canvas, 40 x 36½ in.
Woodstock Artists Association and Museum Permanent Collection. Gift of E.G. Jarman, Jr.

Eugene Speicher, who first studied, and then taught at the Art Students League for five years during the 1910s, is the subject of  Along His Own Lines: A Retrospective of New York Realist Eugene Speicher. “At the height of his fame,” writes Jerry Weiss in the October 2014 issue of the Artist’s Magazine (PDF here), “Eugene Speicher was called ‘America’s most important living painter’ by Esquire magazine.” But his exalted reputation declined precipitously over the second half of the twentieth century.

Speicher painted fellow student Georgia O’Keeffe, when both were studying with William Merritt Chase. Speicher’s portrait, reproduced below in the Art Students League’s 1908–09 annual course catalogue, was acquired as a red dot purchase, and remains part of the school’s permanent collection.

O'Keeffe by Speicher

A spread from the 1908–09 annual course catalogue of the Art Students League

Along His Own Lines opens October 18 at the New York State Museum, Albany.

    Within the painter, there are two things: the eye and the brain; they must serve each other. — Paul Cézanne