Instructors at Large

Karen O’Neil Online

  • July 23, 2014


April Blue Green
Karen O’Neil, April Blue/Green. Oil on linen, 24 x 24 in.

“My fascination with still life began in art school,” explains Karen O’Neil in a recent interview for the blog “The Highway Is My Home.” “Morandi was the first painter to steal my painter’s heart – and I loved contemporary still life as well. Janet Fish has been a big favorite, and inspiration. It’s about the pure joy of seeing – the monumental and profound in our everyday visual experiences.” A selection of O’Neil’s still lifes also appear in a post on the blog “The Jealous Curator.”

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Karen O’Neil, Citrus Series #11. Oil on linen, 10 x 10 in.

A Life’s Work

  • July 15, 2014


Lorrie Goulet, The Cradle of Life, 1969. Limestone, 16 1/2 x 22 in. Collection of Elayne Goldhair.

Lorrie Goulet, The Cradle of Life, 1969. Limestone, 16 1/2 x 22 in. Collection of Elayne Goldhair.

“Carving stone or wood is the gradual removal of material to allow the shape contained in the block to appear,” writes sculptor Lorrie Goulet in a new thick catalogue, The Sculptures of Lorrie Goulet. The compilation covers sixty-six years of the artist’s output that has focused almost exclusively on the female form in stone (green serpentine, grey alabaster, pink granite, white Carrara marble, black Tennessee marble, granite, limestone) and wood (cedar, ebony, mahogany, olive, oak, walnut). Born in 1925, only five years after passage of the Nineteenth Amendment that granted women the right to vote, Goulet, who expressed an early interest in stone carving, was told by her mother and friends, Girls don’t carve. The admonition did not stop her but did permeate the larger context of her training and professional life. “The potency of my work,” she says, “came from a climate not conducive to my success.”

Lorrie Goulet in her Green Street Studio, 1955

Lorrie Goulet in her Green Street Studio, 1955

Lorrie Goulet, Ulysses, 1957. Granite, 14 x 18 in. Collection of Kirby Lane North Association.

Lorrie Goulet, Ulysses, 1957. Granite, 14 x 18 in. Collection of Kirby Lane North Association.

The book also contains Goulet’s five meditations on sculpture, including this excerpt from “The Song of Sculpture.”

Lost ancient sculptures

In broken temples found

A residue of old glories

Of what man has done

Or wished to do

It is a song

Rising from the ruins

Echoed in the crumbling temples

That man and time

Each vandal in his own way

Has made

Lorrie Goulet, Nessa, 1959. White Carrara mable, 13 x 13 in. Collection of the artist.

Lorrie Goulet, Nessa, 1959. White Carrara mable, 13 x 13 in. Collection of the artist.

Lorrie Goulet, Rosemarie, 1957. Carrara marble, 10 x 6 1/2 x 4 in. Collection of the artist.

Lorrie Goulet, Rosemarie, 1957. Carrara marble, 10 x 6 1/2 x 4 in. Collection of the artist.

Lorrie Goulet, Selkie, 1975. Grey Marble, 19 x 13 x 9 in. Private collection.

Lorrie Goulet, Selkie, 1975. Grey Marble, 19 x 13 x 9 in. Private collection.

Lorrie Goulet, Florentina, 1978. Green serpentine stone, 23 x 13 x 10 in. Private collection.

Lorrie Goulet, Florentina, 1978. Green serpentine stone, 23 x 13 x 10 in. Private collection.

Lorrie Goulet, October, 1978. Lignum vitae wood, 22 x 12 1/2 x 8 in. Private collection.

Lorrie Goulet, October, 1978. Lignum vitae wood, 22 x 12 1/2 x 8 in. Private collection.

Leonid’s Nine Days in Italy

  • July 4, 2014


Leonid Gervits, Villa Near Amalfi, 2014. Oil on art board, 8 x 10 in.

Leonid Gervits, Villa Near Amalfi, 2014. Oil on art board, 8 x 10 in.

Every time I travel to Italy, I feel as though it is my first visit. Even when you think you really know the country, you can never anticipate what you will see. I can never get enough of it.

Leonid Gervits, Forum Romano, 2014. Oil on canvas board, 14 x 18 in.

Leonid Gervits, Forum Romano, 2014. Oil on canvas board, 14 x 18 in.

This time I traveled by car. Though it sounds exciting, I must warn you: think twice. There are narrow streets (Naples, Amalfi Coast, Florence) and terrible traffic (Florence, Rome, everywhere inside old towns). Your GPS is not completely reliable. Once I was lost in the middle of nowhere in a thunderstorm and unexpectedly discovered an amazing place called Bomarzo. Overall, though, Italian highways are in great shape and pretty empty compared with those in the US and Germany. They have excellent rest stops and dining places. Best of all, you can take in the countryside. 

Leonid Gervits, Ravello, 2014. Oil on gesso board, 12 x 12 in.

Leonid Gervits, Ravello, 2014. Oil on gesso board, 12 x 12 in.

In spite of all the difficulties, plus the millions of tourists everywhere, I cannot deny my excitement and artistic joy from travel in this marvelous country: Italy.

Leonid Gervits, San Pietro di Roma, 2014. Oil on gesso board, 12 x 16 in.

Leonid Gervits, San Pietro di Roma, 2014. Oil on gesso board, 12 x 16 in.

Friedman at the Pomona Cultural Center

  • July 2, 2014


Pomona Exhibition Final (1)

Marilyn J. Friedman, recipient of a 2014 Adolph & Esther Gottlieb Foundation Individual Support Grant, is exhibiting twenty-one sculptures in a two-person exhibition with painter William Chaiken. Primal Images—Pigment & Clay, which opened at the Pomona Cultural Center (Pomona, NY) June 8, continues through July 27, 2014.

Reginato at ArtHamptons

  • July 1, 2014


Peter Reginato and Ronnie Landfield, along with former student Dee Solin, will be showing paintings with Flagg Gallery at ArtHamptons, which begins July 10, 2014. The fair, in its seventh year, is a “celebration of the Hamptons art community” with 3,000 works by 500 artists from over 80 galleries. This year’s theme is “Escape.”

Peter Reginato, Big Cover Up, 2014. Enamel on canvas, 60 x 44 in.

Peter Reginato, Big Cover Up, 2014. Enamel on canvas, 60 x 44 in.

    Craftsmanship is essential to the artist. He needs it just as he needs brushes, pigments, and a surface to paint in. — Jackson Pollock