Sherry Camhy

Sherry Camhy's work has been exhibited at the Israel Museum, Parrish Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, the Telfair Museum, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, and the Hammond Museum. She has been the subject of reviews in in ArtNewsTime Out New YorkAmerican ArtistFine Art Connoisseur, and International Artist. Her book Art of the Pencil: A Revolutionary Look at Drawing, Painting and the Pencil was published by Watson-Guptill in 1997. She writes the “The Material World" column for Drawing and is a reviewer for Fine Art Connoisseur. In 2013 she curated The Silverpoint Exhibition at the National Arts Club. In addition to offering instruction privately and teaching workshops at New York University, the School of Visual Arts, and the New York Academy of Art, she is on the faculty of the Art Students League where she teaches Painterly Drawing. Her website is www.SherryCamhy.com.

Posts

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            [post_date] => 2018-11-20 15:34:03
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            [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_32148" align="alignright" width="500"] Eugène Delacroix, Sunset, ca. 1850. Pastel on blue laid paper. 8 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Philippe de Montebello, 2014[/caption]

Nearing the end of his life, Eugène Delacroix expressed a wish to know how his work would be thought of in a hundred year’s time. He would be delighted to learn that one hundred and fifty years after his death, his work has been exhibited at the Louvre, at Jill Newhouse (his first gallery show in New York), and in two exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix and Delacroix. Together these exhibitions signify not only an enduring but expanding interest in his work.

The Metropolitan Museum’s two shows are comprehensive, comprising 120 drawings and 155 paintings that together offer an enlightening display of Delacroix’s oeuvre. On view are rare works never before seen in the United States.

The curators enriched both exhibitions with didactic panels that included thumbnail reproductions of related drawings and paintings, offering fresh insights into Delacroix’s process. The wall texts offer details about Delacroix’s era that help modern viewers interpret the images in their historical context.

Devotion to Drawing was first to open and gave center stage to the artist’s works on paper. Two months later a companion exhibition, Delacroix, opened, and the sheer number, monumental size, brilliant color, and utter grandeur of its paintings largely overshadowed the drawings. But the drawings, perhaps quieter and more easily overlooked, have so much to offer.

Delacroix, acclaimed as a great painter during his lifetime, kept his devotion to drawing private. Only after his death, with the surprising discovery of more than 6,000 drawings tucked away in his Rue Furstenberg atelier, did he become recognized as a great draftsman. In his Journals, published posthumously in 1893, he noted, “Color always occupies me but drawing preoccupies me.”

The exhibition’s curators have grouped Delacroix’s works thematically within an overarching chronology of his life. The exhibition presents examples reflecting his early education, his exploration of alternatives to the rational objective values of neoclassicism, and finally his attraction to romanticism and its emotionally-driven, sensational subjects and dramatic compositions, which rely more on a suggestive style and expressive color than on precise draughtsmanship.

[caption id="attachment_32151" align="aligncenter" width="893"] Inside front cover[/caption]

Delacroix’s artistic development is not easily classified into “isms.” He pushed past all boundaries declaring, “I am a pure Classicist,” yet he produced some of the most turbulent and emotional works of the first half of the nineteenth century.

Devotion to Drawing demonstrates Delacroix’s preference for simple, non-commercially manufactured mediums and surfaces: charcoal; red, black, blue, and white chalk; graphite; fabricated black crayon; black and iron gall inks; diluted white gouache; watercolor; “body color” pigments with gum arabic; pastel applied directly or with pen and brush on tracing, writing, wove, or laid paper, toned blue but now faded to green. Delacroix’s images on tracing paper demonstrate its use as a tool to refine his skills and his ideas. First thoughts, premières pensées, are “the germ [that]…every work [would] ultimately possess,” as well as a valuable record of the paths not taken.

The first image in the drawing exhibition is Academic Male Nude with Staff (1817–22), (recto), an example of Delacroix’s early struggle to assimilate the traditional life drawing methods expected in the Salle du Modèle of the École des Beaux-Arts. On the front of the paper (recto), he used painstakingly careful charcoal shading to depict anatomical shapes. Delacroix’s drawing on the back of this paper (verso) shows a slightly different view of the model in the same pose in a style of line more typical of his later drawings.

[caption id="attachment_32141" align="alignright" width="344"] Eugène Delacroix,  Ecorché: Torso of a Male Cadaver, 1828(?). Red, black, and white chalk, graphite. 9 15/16 x 6 1/4 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of William M. Griswold, 2013[/caption]

Both of these drawings look eerily familiar. The classical life drawing techniques used by Delacroix are still to be found in art schools, like the Art Students League of New York, where similar poses, mediums, and “form” lighting (a single source of light from above and to one side) remain in practice. It is interesting to note a growing trend for schools primarily focused on abstract, conceptual, and digital art to add classically-based life drawing classes to their curriculum.

Delacroix’s professional art education began at 17, when he was enrolled in the École des Beaux Arts where a reverence for neoclassicism’s concepts of detailed objective observation, knowledge, contour, form, idealized beauty, and restraint and reason reigned supreme. With unceasing perseverance, Delacroix learned the basic underpinnings of his future work. Once those skills were firmly established and he became entrenched in neoclassicism, Delacroix leaped, shifting paths, becoming a leader of romanticism.

As a student, Delacroix’s studies started with tracing Old Master images, copying them freehand and then drawing from casts, models, anatomy diagrams, and dissections as well as from examples of écorché. Ecorché is a type of dissection in which the skin is removed, allowing clear observation of the superficial muscle structure directly below. It is a flayed anatomical specimen. Écorché: Torso of a Male Cadaver (1828) is drawn in red, black, and white fabricated chalk and graphite. Reverse écorché studies use clay to layer muscles, one by one, onto a constructed skeletal structure.

Delacroix filled his personal sketchbooks with images of horses, lions, tigers, and people in action, details of clothing, textures, plants, locations and landscapes derived from observation, storing what he saw in his memory in order to incorporate a sense of reality to the images derived from his imagination. To Delacroix there were “three crucial elements to art—the observed, the remembered, and the imagined.”

[caption id="attachment_32137" align="alignleft" width="501"] Eugène Delacroix, Crouching Tiger, 1839. Pen and brush and iron gall ink. Overall: 5 3/16 x 7 3/8 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Sanford I. Weill, 2013[/caption]

Crouching Tiger (1839) is not restricted by the need for time-consuming observation of detail. Delacroix was able to quickly capture his subject in the moment. His tiger is alive. It is paused and about to pounce. Delacroix offers us this insight: “If you are not skillful enough to sketch a man falling out of a window during the time it takes him to get from the fifth story to the ground then you will never be able to produce monumental work…Before you begin, study unceasingly, but once started…you must execute freely.”

Normandy Sketchbook (1829) consists of thirty-nine leaves containing thirty-eight drawings in graphite, opened to an exquisite portrait and the sketchbook’s single watercolor, a castle created en plein air.

Delacroix adopted use of watercolor for en plein air sketches he found popular in London and brought the process home with him. He advised, “Learn to draw…and in returning from travel, you will carry with your memories. . .That simple mark of the pencil. . . recalls, along with the place that struck you, all the associations connected with it . . . a thousand delicious impressions.”

[caption id="attachment_32143" align="alignright" width="461"] Eugène Delacroix,Seated and Standing Male Nudes, after photographs by Eugène Durieu, 1855, graphite, 9 1/16 x 10 5/8 in. Gift of Frank Anderson Trapp, in honor of Karen B. Cohen, 2004[/caption]

Seated and Standing Male Nudes, after Photographs by Eugène Durieu (1855) testifies to Delacroix’s surprisingly early use of photo reference. He was one of the first but warned: “Nature is a vast dictionary. Painters who follow their imagination seek in the dictionary the elements which will accommodate their conception…. Those who have no imagination copy the dictionary.”

Appearing in both exhibition catalogues is Delacroix’s Sunset, a pastel of 1850, one of hundreds he made. The medium was rather out of fashion at the time, but eventually Degas and other impressionists began to use it more. Delacroix gravitated toward pastel because, as it explained, “it can be left, resumed, retouched and finished at will.”

Looking at Delacroix’s drawings, it is challenging to identify how artists of the past, like DaVinci, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, John Constable, or Richard Parkes Bonnington, influenced his work, and alternatively how Delacroix’s work influenced the impressionists, surrealists, abstract expressionists, conceptual artists, and even illustrators who followed.

In his day, Delacroix may not have had many students, but he did have critics and many more admirers. Ingres, his neoclassicist archrival, declared Delacroix’s work ”pornographic.” Baudelaire, a prominent art critic, exalted Delacroix as “the most original painter of ancient and modern times…a poet of painting.” Delacroix influenced many who followed. Paul Cézanne believed, “We all paint in his language.” Vincent van Gogh made copies of his paintings. Edgar Degas owned 250 of Delacroix’s works.

If Delacroix could look down on the contemporary art world now, he might be shocked to learn that a woman had recently scrawled graffiti on his Liberty Leading the People. He might chuckle at reading the New Yorker magazine critic Peter Schjeldahl who called him a “show off,” or the New York Times critic Roberta Smith who declared him “a precocious prophet of the modern age.” Pablo Picasso’s words, however, will continue to echo through the ages. “Delacroix, that bastard. He’s really good.”


Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix and Delacroix was on view from July 17 through November 12, 2018. Delacroix, which opened on September 17, continues through January 6, 2019. [post_title] => Delacroix’s Devotion to Drawing [post_excerpt] => While Delacroix might defy easy classification among art historical "isms," his lifelong devotion to drawing is certain. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => delacroix-drawing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-11-21 12:21:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-21 17:21:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=32127 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 31414 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2018-07-26 14:15:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-26 18:15:37 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30999" align="alignright" width="516"]silverpoint tips Sherry Camhy, Moses, 2000, silver and gold on parchment, 14 x 20 in.[/caption] Silverpoint is just one of several metal points that fit into the bigger category of metalpoint,but most artists pick silver to work with because, unlike the other metals, it tarnishes to a very special, rich, warm tone not possible to achieve in any other way. Therefore, the Old Masters’ art technique is most often referred to as silverpoint, although the artist or art historian might be more specific and describe the work as metalpoint done with silver, gold, copper, lead, or iron. The only other metal that tarnishes is copper, but it changes unpredictably to green and reddish hues. A silverpoint or metalpoint stylus looks like a mechanical pencil. It consists of a small piece of metal resembling a piece of graphite in shape — thin, straight, and placed into a holder. It makes marks that at first look like graphite, but the marks need a specially prepared surface to appear, as they will not show up on regular paper. Silverpoint/metalpoint was the Old Masters’ pencil before there were graphite pencils. These artists used the medium for delicate, detailed work, and for cartoons under frescos. Today, contemporary artists are exploring the medium because it is now easy to use, in any size and in many subjects, including portrait and still life. 1. Silverpoint is simple. If you can draw with a pencil, you can do silverpoint. 2. Can you erase silverpoint? Yes! Erasing is easy. The misconception that silverpoint isn’t erasable is one many artists have, and it sometimes prevents them from trying the medium. Very little silver is needed to do a complete work of art. Erasing the silver is like erasing a line of graphite — the amount lost is not worth mentioning. Bonus: Any eraser will do. 3. The secret to success is the surface. Silverpoint marks are not visible on paper, but they appear like magic on the right surface. The surface needs to have a special combination of chemicals. When this medium originated, this formula was difficult to acquire, difficult to prepare, and difficult to work on. Now, commercial gesso or flat acrylic house paint applied to any size illustration board or wood panel is easy to prepare, easy to erase, easy to draw on. 4. Properly prepared surfaces are available at most art stores, as are clay-coated papers, but some of the papers are too fragile for silverpoint, so avoid erasing. Conveniently, art stores sell prepared surfaces, and any surface gesso-prepared for painting will do. I don’t recommend the clay-coated papers sold for silverpoint, however, because the coating is sprayed on very thinly and an eraser can abrade the surface, exposing the paper underneath. When this happens, the silver marks will no longer show up; so you can take off a mistake but can’t put a correct mark in its place. 5. The old masters struggled creating mysterious gesso formulas to make metalpoint (silver, lead, copper, gold) marks appear on parchment, wood, or fresco walls, but for your surface any commercial gesso or even flat latex house paint can work on any sized watercolor paper, illustration board, or canvas. 6. Silverpoint as a medium is easy to access. Metal points of silver, lead, copper, and gold, and their stylus holders, are affordable and available online. But any sterling spoon, lead nail, copper wire, or gold trinket will work. Simply use the tip of the item and start drawing on your surface! 7. Use any of the following to add color to silverpoint: colored pencil, pastel, pan pastel, egg tempera, gouache, watercolor, mixed media, or oil paint. Try a portrait, figure, landscape, still life, real, abstract, imagined. Any subject, any size, any color is possible!
Register for Sherry Camhy’s October 2018 workshop to learn how to draw with silverpoint at www.theartstudentsleague.org [post_title] => Seven Secrets of Silverpoint [post_excerpt] => Silverpoint/metalpoint was the Old Masters’ pencil before there were graphite pencils. These artists used the medium for delicate, detailed work, and for cartoons under frescos. Contemporary artists are exploring the medium because it is now easy to use, in any size and for many subjects. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => silverpoint-tips [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-26 14:21:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-26 18:21:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=31414 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 31350 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2018-07-25 09:05:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-25 13:05:01 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_31368" align="alignright" width="403"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Candy Ball Machine, 1977, gouache and pastel. Collection of Gretchen and John Berggruen, San Francisco. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY[/caption] To look at an artwork in person yields a richer, unmediated, and somehow more authentic experience than seeing it projected onto a screen, printed in a book, or illuminated on a smart phone. This idea may seem a truism, but I found it particularly apropos for taking in the drawings of Wayne Thiebaud now on view at the Morgan Library & Museum. Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman is the first comprehensive museum show focusing on the drawings of an artist best known for his colorful paintings of cakes, slices of pie, and ice cream cones. The lively and insightful wall texts incorporate Thiebaud’s insights and commentary about the work on display. This exhibition is full of surprises. There are examples of the artist’s cartoons, still lifes, portraits, figure studies, cityscapes, landscapes, exploratory sketches, preparatory studies, and finished works of art. Thiebaud used a variety of media: charcoal, graphite, ballpoint, ink, pastel, colored pencil, watercolor, gouache and oil in a multitude of diverse combinations applied with pencil, pen, and brush on surfaces such as Strathmore Bristol 500, Strathmore Either Side, and Illustration Board. The works are hung in a rough chronology with curators choosing to group them according to his diverse styles throughout his long career. Many pieces on view have multiple dates, revealing the artist’s habit of revisiting a work, sometimes years later. Leonardo da Vinci also worked endlessly on his drawings and paintings returning time and again to improve Mona Lisa until his death. How often have you stopped working on a drawing or painting in despair? Or stopped thinking it is perfect? Try putting an image away for a while, and then returning to it with a fresh eye, added knowledge, and new technical skills. It is a time-proven and profitable process. [caption id="attachment_31361" align="alignleft" width="500"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Shelf of Pies, 1960, brush and ink, watercolor, and charcoal. Private collection. Photography courtesy of The Morgan Library & Museum. Photography by Graham S. Haber 2017. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY[/caption] Throughout his career Wayne Thiebaud has considered the relationship of medium to image: What happens if “a thick rich colorful painting is transposed into a black and white or a sparse less sensual medium?” Shelf of Pies (1960) is an example of the artist’s use of simplified, stylized shapes presented sequentially with powerfully heightened contrasts of a slightly warm black, white, and grey. Ordinary pies are suddenly reminiscent of film noir. When asked, Why pies? Wayne Thiebaud explained: “I took three basic shapes to work with: a rectangle, an ellipse or a circle and a triangle. Well, that is a piece of pie…. When I painted the first row of pies, I can remember sitting and laughing…. Now, I have flipped out…. I thought to myself,  —this’ll be the end of me. Nobody’s going to take me seriously—but I could not leave it alone.” Thiebaud returned to the same subject toying with what art historian Lizzie Boubli terms “progressive variants” of values, colors, and compositions. Candy Sticks and Peppermint Sticks, both of 1964, and Page of Sketches with Candy Sticks, done during the 1960s, are displayed together and demonstrate alternative possibilities. [caption id="attachment_31363" align="alignright" width="500"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Candy Sticks, 1964, watercolor and graphite. Yale University Art Gallery, Bequest of Susan Morse Hilles. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY[/caption] Moving out of one’s comfort zone, as Thiebaud did, away from the stagnating use of the same medium in the same way, is a creative challenge that can foster fresh ideas. To understand more about Thiebaud’s ideas, take photos of his color studies, convert them into black and white values, then view the originals again to discover how his use of relative values are at play in his color choices. Pausing to look closely, attentively, and perhaps even to stare a bit, at almost any of Thiebaud’s color still-life objects or figure images, his use of some surprising optical illusions becomes apparent. At first, objects seem obviously defined, simple, pleasant, pretty, quite familiar, and realistic. Then, they melt. Thiebaud’s inventive use of the visual and photographic halation is at work. Bright areas appear slightly blurry. His subtle use of hard- and soft-edged lines in repeated unmixed complementary colors isolate individual forms, making three-dimensional objects shimmer on their radiant white backgrounds. Colors and darks surrounded with white appear darker and more intense. The even surfaces of negative areas contrast with the heavy impasto of the positive, pushing them forward, off the picture plane. The varying widths and sharpness of edges makes shapes shift in space to create a dynamic tension. Lively light seems to emanate from the objects themselves. It is the result of Thiebaud’s application of Hans Hofmann’s dictum to figuration: “In nature, light creates color; in the picture, color creates light.” The result is magical. [caption id="attachment_31373" align="alignleft" width="500"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Untitled (Three Ice Creams), 1964, pastel and graphite, 9 1/4 x 12 1/4 in. Private collection.[/caption] Wayne Thiebaud derived his signature style from many influences. He claims to have never felt “comfortable with that easy categorization of fine and commercial art,” nor does he feel that there is “much of any interest that separates abstract and figurative painting.” The artist’s influences are eclectic. Born in Mesa, Arizona, he moved to Los Angeles and studied at the Frank Wiggins Trade School, where he learned about design, composition, symbolic imagery, graphic conventions, and core techniques of commercial art. Later in New York, as a struggling cartoonist, illustrator, sign painter, designer, commercial artist, and advertising art director, he absorbed the International Style. He picked up its minimal “less is more” aesthetic; the “methodology of reduction”; visual impact; the grid; exaggerated perspective; bird’s-eye views; foreshortening; strong directional compositional guides; focus points; the use of white space; vivid contrasts and primary complementary colors. During a stint working at Universal Studios and serving in the United States Army Air Force, he learned about lighting, photography, and film. Thiebaud went on to study at the Art Students League of New York, taking a sabbatical from a teaching post at UC Davis, acquiring additional techniques and learning about concepts of form, observation, memory, and symbolic representation from a fine art perspective. He adopted Abstract Expressionism’s impulsive line and lush, painterly brush strokes without the movement’s angst; abstraction, without excluding representation, Proto-pop and Pop ideas without their hard-edged, flat, mechanical quality, and concepts of Photorealism without its excessive, exacting, or exaggerated detail. [caption id="attachment_31362" align="alignright" width="464"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Three Roads, 1983, charcoal. Private collection. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY[/caption] “I slowly began to think about becoming an artist,” he has said of this period. Thiebaud’s interest in depicting commonplace objects appears to have predated that of Pop artists. He explored color theory with his own vision, perspective with his own point of view, and he found his own signature subjects, his own signature style. Wayne Thiebaud’s creative process relied on remembering information from observation and then reconstructing it from imagination. His images are based on abstract simplifications that allow him to depict a subject’s Platonic form. His images emerge as easily recognizable, perfectly-stylized symbols. Though not realistically rendered, his images of things are exactly what we expect them to look like. It is impossible for me to resist thinking about Thiebaud’s delectable edibles celebrating America’s postwar abundance in contrast with Chaim Soutine's images of slaughtered animal flesh that make suggestive references to the Holocaust in a show now on view at the Jewish Museum. Wayne Thiebaud’s pies, cupcakes, and ice cream cones appear as tempting treats tauntingly out of reach, displayed in shop windows and countertops, available to those who strive to afford them. The artist’s figures, done with similar media as his still lifes, seem equally remote, as isolated as the individual pies composed in groups but spaced apart. His figures feel like objects that are simply subject matter for color studies. Thiebaud’s striking cityscapes and landscapes bring to mind the art of his fellow Californian artist, Richard Diebenkorn, but Thiebaud’s San Francisco streets are more harshly askew and oddly real. Three Roads (1983) started en plein air and was finished in the artist’s studio where he used easily erasable charcoal to play freely with the perspective of what he actually saw to render a tenuous, tension-provoking effect that produces the vertiginous visual experience. Three Roads is dotted with tiny isolated individuals, so dwarfed by the scale of the buildings, that they are almost invisible. They are going about their business unconnected, unaware of each other. A smudge on the lower left of the image suggests someone walking a dog on the corner under the light post. On a roadway located near the uppermost edge is an artist drawing at an easel but facing away from the pictured scene. Is it a revealing self-portrait? [caption id="attachment_31360" align="alignleft" width="447"]Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman Wayne Thiebaud, Self Portrait, ca. 1970, graphite. From the artist’s studio. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY[/caption] Wayne Thiebaud’s Self Portrait (ca. 1970), done in graphite, is an elegant example of his skill as a draughtsman in the academic tradition using hatching, cross-hatching, and chiaroscuro to create the illusion of form on a flat picture plane. Contrary to the prevailing concepts of his contemporary educators and artists, Wayne Thiebaud remained steadfast in his belief that a knowledge of art history, anatomy, perspective, composition and technically-precise craft does not stifle creativity but rather frees it. His countless notations, often cropped storyboard-style, demonstrate the value of making “sketches while visiting different countries, walking in museums, listening to concerts.” This is a habit that all artists should develop. As an instructor, he advised students to copy Old Master drawings. Untitled (After Daumier) shows him doing just that. Drawing, he has said, “is a kind of inquiring research tool that painting rests on.” Why not try copying a Thiebaud?
Wayne Thiebaud in conversation with Timothy Clark and Gene Cooper at the Art Students League can be viewed on the Art Students League's YouTube channel. [post_title] => Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman [post_excerpt] => What we can learn from the process of an artist who defies neat categorization. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => wayne-thiebaud-draftsman [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-25 09:58:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-25 13:58:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=31350 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 31242 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2018-07-05 10:19:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-05 14:19:30 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Portrait of Olivia is now on view at the Lyme Art Association Gallery as part of the 85th Annual Juried Exhibition of the Hudson Valley Art Association. The show continues through August 3. Camhy has written an article about creating this portrait, demonstrating her method, step-by-step, for an upcoming issue of Artist Magazine. Find out more about her upcoming silverpoint/metalpoint workshop scheduled for October 22–26 at the Art Students League (link here). [caption id="attachment_31245" align="aligncenter" width="500"]sherry camhy silverpoint Sherry Camhy, Portrait of Olivia, 2018, silverpoint, 29 x 16 in.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy and Silverpoint: An Exhibition, Publication, and Workshop [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Portrait of Olivia is now on view at the Lyme Art Association Gallery as part of the 85th Annual Juried Exhibition of the Hudson Valley Art Association. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-silverpoint [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-27 14:11:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-27 18:11:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=31242 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29593 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2018-02-06 16:04:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-02-06 21:04:10 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_29606" align="alignleft" width="376"] Michelangelo Buonarroti, Portrait of Andrea Quaratesi, 1532, drawing, black chalk, 16 3/16 x 11½ in. The British Museum, London[/caption]

There is not a single word that comes close to adequately describing the spectacular, splendid, superb, magnificent, monumental, massive, memorable, exhaustive, exhausting, and exhilarating experience of Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The exhibition comprises more than two hundred works of art gathered from fifty art institutions, countless private collections, and those culled from the Metropolitan Museum’s own holdings. Carmen C. Bambach curated the exhibition brilliantly. Its title is carefully chosen: Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer. Each word, even the artist’s name, resonates with significance. 

Michelangelo: “michel” translates to “not mortal” and “angelo” to “heaven sent.” Michelangelo was named by his father, Lodovico, a minor dignitary who held high expectations for his second son only to be disappointed when he discovered Michelangelo could not be stopped from wasting his time drawing studies of male anatomy and insisted on following in the footsteps of his wet nurse’s stonecutter husband. (Michelangelo later jokingly declared, “[T]ook the hammer and chisels with which I carve my figures from my wet-nurse’s milk.”)  Lodovico might have noted with the benefit of hindsight that “Michelangelo” could not have been more appropriately named.

[caption id="attachment_29605" align="alignright" width="400"] Michelangelo Buonarroti, Young Archer, ca. 1490, marble, H. 37 x W. 13 1/4 x D. 14 in. Lent by the French State, Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs[/caption]

Divine, or “Il Divino,” was the name Michelangelo earned with his talent, the one his contemporaries used to address the nobly-regarded, highly-respected, wealthy, famous artist, and god-like superstar. He paved the way for future artists to reach the social status of celebrity. The use of the word “divine” also points to the underlying Neoplatonic concept of Michelangelo’s oeuvre, namely, the artist’s concern for the relationship between man and God, the human body as a holy creation—neither shameful, sinful, nor pornographic.

“Draftsman” is usually used to describe someone highly skilled in drawing, and it is a term sometimes used with a negative connotation. In this context, its meaning denotes one who draws beautifully and expressively. Michelangelo’s draftsmanship evinces not only unsurpassed skill, but also serious searching and visual thinking. It is a language of its own, drawing taken to the level of an independent art. In this sense, he was not only a draftsman but also an artist.

“Designer" is the closest English translation of disegno, though it lacks the nuances of meaning the Italian usage carried with it in Michelangelo’s time. The term encompassed not only the idea of designing but also drawing as well. It also refers to a person with the genius and crucial inherent sense of balance and proportion and with the aesthetic sensibility necessary to create original concepts that underlie any art form.

[caption id="attachment_29603" align="alignleft" width="400"] Florence Michelangelo, Female Figure Seen in Bust-Length From the Front (Cleopatra), 1530–1533, black chalk, 9 3/16 x 7 3/16 in. Casa Buonarroti, Florence[/caption]

The Met’s exhibition demonstrates the artist’s all-encompassing genius. It is beautifully mounted. Starred among the show-stopping paintings and sculptures are one hundred and thirty-three rarely seen drawings, most by Michelangelo.

The images display a wide range of techniques: line, crosshatching, blending, smudging, moistening, and erasing, as well as an impressive variety of materials: black and red chalk, charcoal, lead, silver, ink, gouache applied with pen, brush, stylus, and metal point,* often in multi-media layered combinations. There are informal anatomy studies, detailed presentation and architectural drawings on handmade papers, some toned, some faded, and some joined into quite large surfaces for full-sized fresco cartoons.

The fragility of these works on paper limits the time they can be illuminated, so this exhibition presents a rare opportunity to not only photograph them (not just the entire image but also smaller sections), but also use the camera as a magnifier to enlarge the images to see the fine details. It is surprising to discover smudges that suddenly emerge as several sketches, one on top of another, revealing not only the artist’s technical process but his creative one as well. 

Michelangelo often drew on his students’ study sheets, and they on his. Attribution, consequently, is sometimes an issue. How do you know who did what? You have to judge for yourself. Look for the casual assurance of Michelangelo’s hand: his flowing, twisting mannerism as well as the grace, rhythm, and the forceful rapid energy of his marks. Craft in the service of curiosity. An artisan’s skill in the service of an artist’s searching soul.

[caption id="attachment_29614" align="alignright" width="400"] Attributed to Daniele da Volterra, Michelangelo Buonarroti, probably ca. 1544, oil on wood, 34 3/4 x 25 1/4 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Clarence Dillon, 1977[/caption]

The exhibit is full of curatorial surprises. The first object in the exhibit is neither a drawing nor a painting. Instead, at the very beginning of the first gallery, there is a display case containing a slim paper pamphlet open to an etching of Michelangelo accompanied with Latin text. Few stop to glance at it. But the placement of this extract from Giorgio Vasari’s Lives of the Artists of 1568 is an obvious clue to both its importance in art history and to this exhibit in particular.

The extract contains a biography about Michelangelo written by Vasari, someone who knew him well. Vasari had been apprenticed to Michelangelo as a young man, became a noteworthy artist, sculptor, and author credited as the first art historian, renowned for writing about both the life of the artists of his time and the renaissance of interest in classical concepts, the divine beauty of the human body, and the rise of the importance of drawing in Italy that began during the fourteenth century and continued through the sixteenth century.

Vasari’s Lives is key to unlocking the door into Michelangelo’s world and his role as “unsurpassed master of “disegno.” “Design” may be the most commonly used English translation of the term as an alternative to the Italian, but there really is no adequate translation of the word in any language. Vasari used disegno to refer to the idea of an artist as a God-like creator capable of using imagination to form an original aesthetic compositional concept, one able to execute that idea in a drawing, painting, sculpture, or architectural structure.

The biography is filled with authoritative descriptions, antidotes, and insights.  If you are curious about Michelangelo’s broken nose, or looking for a firsthand account of the painting of the Sistine ceiling, you might want to read an English translation Lives. It would have been helpful to have key excerpts from the text placed along with the extract, but there are many excerpts to be found sprinkled throughout the exhibit.  It is possible to ask for a copy of the printed information accompanying the images on the walls of the exhibit and as well as the text of the audiotapes.

The exhibition unfolds chronologically, touching on crucial stages of Michelangelo’s achievements, including the work of his predecessors, instructors, mentors, and collaborators who contributed to the development of his skills and sensibilities as well as examples of the work of artists his vision immediately influenced. The exhibit provides an opportunity to see what he studied and then observe what he did to equal and surpass it all.

[caption id="attachment_29604" align="alignleft" width="401"] Attributed to Michelangelo, Torment of Saint Anthony , c. 1487–1488, oil and tempera on panel, 18 1⁄2 in × ​13 3⁄4 in. Kimbell Art Museum.[/caption]

As a thirteen-year-old newly apprenticed to Ghirlandaio’s workshop, Michelangelo had access to Martin Schongauer’s etching Torment of Saint Antony. He had the courage to not only copy it, but to also embellish the original concept, turning it into a painting by adding tempera color, and then adding details of fish scales and a landscape in the distance.

Michelangelo relentlessly studied perspective, proportion, and anatomy. He did dissections and countless drawings from life, whole figures, but also studies of hands, feet, even toes. He created movable wax models to design simple and complex composition possibilities. He traced, altered and perfected detailed presentation images and full-sized cartoons that enabled him to prepare to paint frescos like those of the Sistine Chapel. Many of those drawings are on view together under one of the most arresting installations of the exhibition; the breathtaking backlit photographic reproduction of the Sistine Chapel fresco hung on high from the ceiling of a gallery

Although the photographic mural is mounted in a flat manner that unfortunately does not come close to approximating the height and arching shape of the original ceiling, the museum display is an unforgettable sight. Looking up with your head tilted back to locate, say, Studies for the Libyan Sibyl within the ceiling reproduction, you can begin to feel what it may have been like for Michelangelo to work, day after day, painting a painting he never wanted to start, in a position no one should be asked to endure. “My brush, above me all the time, drips paint turning my face into a perfect drop cloth.”

Imagine how difficult it must have been for Michelangelo to conceive and complete such a work of art, and a fresco no less. A surface that required an extremely carefully prepared and correctly applied wet mixture put on one predetermined area at a time and furthermore demanded that the damp section be painted totally perfectly and completely finished before it dried.

In spite of the amazing accomplishment of completing the Sistine Ceiling, Michelangelo never thought of himself as a painter but rather as a sculptor. He was an architect. He was a poet. He was the embodiment of “Renaissance.”

Don Maniato, a cleric, in a letter to Vasari described meeting Michelangelo just weeks before his eighty-ninth birthday. The ancient man appeared caked with dust mixed with sweat. “He walks bent over and has difficulty raising his head. And yet he still continues to work at carving stone.”

There has never been another artist like him. It is impossible to write about his whole life’s output. There has never been an exhibition of work by and about Michelangelo of this scale. It is impossible to adequately describe all of the work on view. 

It is amazing to witness visitors queuing outside in the freezing cold just to see this exhibition. To avoid them, try using the street-level “Education Entrance,” just south of the main one or even the garage entrance. Consider leaving backpacks, purses, packages, and extra heavy clothing at home to avoid lengthy inspections and long waits at the coat check. Do bring your phone camera fully charged to take photographs of your favorite images and explanatory wall text. The catalogue accompanying the exhibition is well-written, but even it cannot tell the whole story.

Think about seeing the exhibition starting from the end where it is likely to be less crowded than at the beginning. Many people find it too much to see at once and stop halfway through for a break.

Plan to see it, not just once but several times to properly view the whole exhibit. But whatever you do, don’t miss it.


*It is interesting to note that although the information on the wall accompanying Francesco Granacci’s Studies for a Standing Draped Figure and Heads of Two Youths states that “no metalpoint drawings by Michelangelo survive,” wall cards describing materials used in several examples of his architectural studies note that “leadpoint,” a form of “metalpoint,” was used for fine lines in those images.

[post_title] => Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer [post_excerpt] => Michelangelo’s draftsmanship evinces not only unsurpassed skill, but also serious searching and visual thinking. It is a language of its own, drawing taken to the level of an independent art. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => michelangelo-met-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-02-06 19:02:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-02-07 00:02:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=29593 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29096 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2017-11-22 15:40:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-22 20:40:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_29110" align="alignright" width="400"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library Francisco de Goya, Leave it all to Providence (Dejalo todo a la probidencia), 1816–20, black ink and gray wash, 10½ x 7¼ in. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1999.22[/caption]

In 1941, a fourteen-year-old boy, a student at the Art Students League, became fascinated with the mysteries of drawing. His name was Eugene V. Thaw. Years later, while working towards a master’s degree in art history at Columbia University, he realized his calling. “I can’t create the objects I crave to look at so I collect them,” and with the encouragement of his wife, Claire Eddy Thaw, for the next several decades, he did exactly that.

At ninety, after a lifetime of studying, gathering, and living with some of the world’s most wondrous drawings, Eugene Thaw decided that “[a]fter I’ve owned them and learned about them, I don’t need them anymore. They’re with me, and I can give them away.” Recently, he did.  In keeping with his belief that, “it’s…one of the joys of life to share,” and to make it possible for other people to see them, he donated the works, now known as “The Thaw Collection,” to the Morgan Library & Museum. One hundred and fifty drawings, selected from more than four hundred in the collection, are now on view in Drawn to Greatness.

Recent reviews of the works in the Thaw Collection emphasize their huge art historical significance. In accompanying reproductions, the images are often printed large. On a computer, they fill the screen. Even on entering the Morgan, Francisco De Goya’s Leave It All to Providence, a work of a mere 10 x 7 inches, is enlarged to cover an entire wall of the exhibition’s entrance.

[caption id="attachment_29138" align="alignleft" width="350"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library Lucas Cranach the Elder, Portrait of a Man in a Black Hat, 1530–35, oil paint, 250 x 195 mm. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum[/caption]

Many visitors entering the exhibition gallery seem surprised, perhaps expecting to see what is more common in contemporary art exhibitions – walls hung with work of similar sizes and shapes, often unframed and usually impressively large. But in Drawn to Greatness the images are strikingly small. Perhaps that might have been expected. The work of the Old Masters had to be because paper was precious. The images had to be small and also less consistent in size. Clearly, however, size is not the only criterion of importance. On close observation, these small works are so full of complex narrative depictions, significant details, sophisticated symbols, and expressive marks that it is impossible not to wonder at their magic, to not ask, “How on earth did those artists do that?”

Using a magnifying glass or, better yet, a phone camera’s enlarging capabilities to view these remarkable images can reveal some amazing optical illusions. What at first appear to be highly defined facial expressions and realistic landscapes are sometimes revealed to be only deftly suggested ones. Look. See. Learn. How did the artists accomplish this?

[caption id="attachment_29139" align="alignright" width="350"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library Jacques de Gheyn II, Studies of a Fantastic Bird, Toad, Frog, and Dragonfly, 1596–1602, pen and brown ink, watercolor, and opaque watercolor, with traces of metalpoint, on paper prepared with white ground, 4½ x 5½ in. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum.[/caption]

Unlike seeing these images on the pages of a book or looking at them glaring from the screen of a computer, in the exhibition their very presence, the very sensual sense of each original image can be intimately felt. The collection must be seen in order to feel, react to, and learn from the full impact of the drawings.

Entering the exhibition galleries is like strolling through the pages of a book about the history of drawing edited by Thaw’s educated eye; being able to pause in front pivotal masterpieces of the fifteenth through the twenty-first centuries including work by Rembrandt, Ingres, Cezanne, Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso, Pollock, Diebenkorn, to linger over a series of witty, poignantly-titled Goyas, to see the pages of private letters Van Gogh wrote displayed near the drawings he spoke of, to gaze at several examples of Degas’ multi-layered pastel-painted print techniques, and then perhaps to stop at a number of dream-like Redons.

[caption id="attachment_29136" align="alignleft" width="300"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, Female Nude, ca. 1810, black and white chalk on blue paper, 23 3/16 x 12 7/16 in. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum.[/caption]

Each piece of art is perfectly presented in a frame chosen by Thaw. Some frames are elaborately decorative, some elegantly simple. Each work is matted or floated to show its deckled, rough, torn, cut, or delicately-defined, inked edges that reveal the smooth, rough, wove, laid, aged, toned, green, blue, brown, tan, faded, and white-prepared surfaces. There are also some works drawn on inconspicuously patched together pieces of paper to expand the size of the sheets but also to correct composition issues. Even the Old Masters sometimes needed to add additional room for something. They sometimes splattered, smudged, or smeared mediums where they might have wished they hadn’t. Seeing the actual surfaces is crucial to understanding the drawing concepts and techniques possible on them. 

The information accompanying each image carefully notes the media used. The variety of surfaces and mediums of drawings in the Thaw Collection offers to artists a rare opportunity to see directly what the Old Masters used and how they used it, not just from secondary “how-to” texts or YouTube videos.

[caption id="attachment_29137" align="alignright" width="323"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library German School, 15th century, Drapery Study, verso (by another hand): Drapery Study. Verso (by another hand): Martyrdom of St. Matthew, ca. 1480, verso: ca. 1430–1500, red and white opaque watercolor with black watercolor over black chalk; verso: pen and black ink. 8 1/16 x 5 5/8 in. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum.[/caption]

The range of dry materials reflected in the exhibit includes single- and multiple-layered applications of charcoal, oiled-charcoal, graphite, metalpoint; black, red, and white chalk; as well as brush-applied blue, brown, and black ink washes; transparent and opaque watercolor; gum Arabic glazes; gouache, acrylic, oil, gold and silver paint and varnish. The inclusion of such widely varying mediums and examples of their different possible uses raises the question, "What is the distinction between painting and drawing?" The answer, at least in this collection, is apparently that a drawing is any work on paper.

For an artist, there is much to glean from the exhibit about the evolution of drawing techniques from the types of paper and mediums artists used; from their compositions; from model books, sketchbooks, preparatory studies, architectural studies, commissioned and informal portrait images; from works of political satire, narrative, landscape, still life, drapery, and the human figure.

Included in the exhibition is an example of a multi-media collage created before 1808, in which Caspar David Friedrich cut-and-pasted and then inserted an unpainted white paper moon into his Moonlit Landscape. He proceeded to dramatically display the picture with a flickering candle placed behind the new moon so that its light danced upon the highlights of the pond and set the birch tree leaves aglow. 

[caption id="attachment_29135" align="alignleft" width="451"]Drawn to Greatness Morgan Library Caspar David Friedrich, Moonlit Landscape, before 1808, watercolor and opaque watercolor; the moon, cut-and-pasted insert, 9⅛ x 14⅜ inches; secondary support: 9½ x 14⅝ in. Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum.[/caption]

The Morgan’s exhibition demonstrates that drawing is an essential form of artistic expression, standing both independent of and equal to all other media. The Thaw Collection is an amazingly generous gift not only to the Morgan but also to all art lovers, especially artists. The collection must be seen to appreciate the history of drawing and its impact on contemporary art.

The exhibition is open to the ticketed public during usual museum hours, but is free from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Friday evenings.  There are also scheduled times for artists to study and draw directly from the works of art. 


[post_title] => Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection [post_excerpt] => These small works are so full of complex narrative depictions, significant details, sophisticated symbols, and expressive marks that it is impossible not to wonder at their magic. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => drawn-to-greatness [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-27 10:29:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 15:29:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=29096 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28615 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2017-09-26 13:55:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-26 17:55:24 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_28625" align="alignright" width="401"] Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Portrait of a Lady, after 1894, silverpoint on paper, mounted on pulp board, 22 1/2 x 18 7/8 in. Purchase, Bequests of Eliza W. Howland, Collis P. Huntington, Vera Ruth Miller, Lillie P. Bliss, Egbert Guernsey Rankin, and George D. Pratt, by exchange; Gifts of George I. Seney, Mrs. George Langdon Jewett, A. W. Bahr, Allison V. Armour, E. Everett Dickinson Jr., J. Pierpont Morgan, John G. Agar, and George A. Hearn, by exchange; and Vain and Harry Fish Foundation Inc. Gift, 1984, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption]

The Gilded Age of Drawing in America at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has not received the fanfare it deserves. It is not accompanied by a Met publication, nor is it easy to locate within the museum, tucked as it is in a rear section of the first floor of the American wing. Though not easy to find, this exhibition is not to be missed.

When you open the double glass door entrance to the exhibition and descend the elegant wooden staircase leading into the quiet, dimly-illuminated suite of galleries, you will find yourself surrounded by light-sensitive drawings from the museum’s own collection that are rarely displayed. With the exception of several recent important acquisitions, the major portion of the artwork came into the Met’s collection just after its founding, in 1870, and within the artists’ lifetimes.

The exhibition, organized by Sylvia Yount, Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the museum’s American wing, is an example of the museum’s recent commitment to share lesser known parts of its peerless collection with the public on a rotating basis. It also is a clear indication of the growing recognition of drawing as an important art, one increasingly recognized as significant as painting.

All of the images in the exhibition are works on paper, and therefore, in this instance, conveniently categorized as “drawings,” though many might as well be referred to as paintings. As such, this selection of work reflects the blurring of the concepts of drawing and painting.

[caption id="attachment_28632" align="alignleft" width="397"] Fidelia Bridges, Bird's Nest in Cattails, ca. 1875, watercolor and gouache on light brown wove paper, 14 x 9 7/8 in. Anonymous Gift, in memory of Harry Rubin, 1989, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption]

The exhibit includes work in charcoal, graphite, chalk, pastel, watercolor, gouache, multi-media, with a single stunning silverpoint by Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Portrait of a Woman (1894). Although watercolor was the preeminent medium used by artists during this era, every image included in this exhibition is an outstanding example of other mediums available for use during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The term “Gilded Age” was adapted from the title of a novel by Mark Twain and his neighbor Charles Dudley Warner, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, published in 1873. The title had been taken from a line in Shakespeare, “To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,” that describes wasteful and ridiculous excess. The period was marked by great disparity between rich and poor, and between the freedoms and limitations between men and women artists during the rise of cultural institutions such as the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Art Students League of New York and the Metropolitan Museum of Art itself. The group of artwork chosen for The Gilded Age of Drawing in America reflects well the tempo of those times. 

The images are hung thematically (figure, landscape, and still life) and range from sketches and preparatory studies to independent, fully-realized works of art. There are three dozen images in the exhibition, including several by watercolor masters such as Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, James McNeil Whistler, and Thomas Eakins. It is difficult not to be simply overwhelmed by the beauty of the work, but it is also worth pausing to understand exactly how each was done. 

It is interesting to note, for example, how many of the artists of the period chose to work on rough wove surfaces of a warm umber hue so different from many contemporary papers of glaring white. The descriptive texts accompanying the images note the surfaces as paper of different textures but they do not note its color. By looking closely at unworked areas within or near the borders of the art, you can often detect the underlying color and value present.

[caption id="attachment_28626" align="alignright" width="400"]gilded age drawing america review Cecelia Beaux, Ernesta Drinker, 1905, charcoal on tan paper, 18.5 x 14.4 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption]

It is also worth noting how many of the venerated watercolor artists of the period used gouache and opaque white in their paintings in violation of our own era’s recurrent warning against that “non-traditional” practice.

In many cases, the original work has not been on view for thirty years or more. Some of the images in the exhibition are very familiar from countless reproductions while some will be for some new discoveries. Mary Cassatt’s Mother Feeding Child (1898), a pastel on wove paper, mounted on canvas, is perhaps better known than the work of the six other women artists in the exhibit.

Cecilia Beaux’s drawing Ernesta Drinker (1905) is simply done, charcoal on brown paper, and totally, utterly, completely charming. Violet Oakley’s portrait Cleveland Johnson indicates both her indebtedness to Cecilia Beaux, her “first master” at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and Oakley’s own voice. The small white chalk and pastel color accents Oakley uses in her work adds a different emotional dimension and strength to her poignant portrait.

The watercolors of Fidelia Bridges, Bird’s Nest in Cattails (1875), and Ellen Robbins, Wildflowers (1875), as well as the pastel of the "queen of flower painters," Laura Coombs Hill’s Hollyhocks in Sunshine (1920s), are all examples of meticulous dedication to the concept of “fidelity to nature.”   

[caption id="attachment_28621" align="alignleft" width="400"] Jane Peterson, Parade, undated, gouache, watercolor, charcoal, and graphite on gray wove paper, 23 15/16 x 18 in. Gift of Martin Horwitz, 1976, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption]

Far from nature, in Jane Paterson’s mixed media work Parade (1917–19), painted in support of the country’s World War I efforts, the artist’s vantage point is on the street near her studio at 58 West 57th, across from a crowd of faceless New Yorkers watching the disappearing parade and the flags and banners flapping in the breeze from the tops of the buildings. The foreground, the pavement, is indicated almost entirely by the rough texture and concrete color of the paper’s finish. Paterson’s confident, quick brush strokes, some thick with heavy opaque gouache, some dry brushed, others transparent wide wet on wet watercolor washes or thin sharp accents of line, all add to the feeling of movement, of a fleeting moment caught in a grand painterly style.

Henry Ossawa Tanner’s Study for the Young Sabot Maker (1893), is an example of a preparatory grisaille in gouache and watercolor. It was begun when he was a student of Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, but the final version of the painting, with the composition reversed, was completed in France where Tanner had moved in response to the racial bias he felt in America. Henry Ossawa Tanner was the first African American to gain international fame.

Charles Ethan Porter was the first known professional African-American artist to specialize in still-life images. Although he was highly recognized and esteemed as an artist during his lifetime, he was destined to die in poverty. His work was recently added to the museum’s collection and is highlighted in the exhibition.

[caption id="attachment_28623" align="alignright" width="475"]gilded age drawing america review Winslow Homer, Boys in a Dory, 1873, watercolor washes and gouache over graphite underdrawing on medium rough textured white wove paper, 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. Bequest of Molly Flagg Knudtsen, 2001. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption]

Among the more familiar images in the exhibit is Winslow Homer’s Boys in a Dory (1873), done on a warm white medium wove paper. It depicts young boys out rowing one warm summer’s day. Traces of graphite hint at how Homer sketched in the composition and defined details like the mischievous eyes of the boy who is peeking out from the picture as well as the profile and the anatomy of the legs of the one sitting with his toes curled dangling over the water. The other boys’ faces are turned away hidden from our view. All of them wear straw hats to shield their eyes from the bright sunlight.

Homer’s watercolor is about that light and the use of optical illusion to capture it. By darkening areas around the white of the paper, its white looks whiter. Homer sets the stage to capture the luminosity of the day with subtly warm grey washes for the clouds and the sky and murky darks at the bottom of the dory where it merges, submerges and blurs with the boat’s shadow in the water directly below it. The noon sun is not seen. It is felt.

Dry brush strokes of dark skim over the rough paper’s surface to create a multitude of tiny dots and spots of light where the lower fibers remain untouched and white. Deftly painted sharp-edged details of cool white opaque gouache appear slightly lighter than the tone of the paper and add bright accents. They sparkle. The museum’s cool grey walls enhance Homer’s efforts. The sunlight in the picture shimmers and plays magically on the water’s waves.

There are too many superb images in The Gilded Age of Drawing in America to note in the space of a review. This exhibition must be seen, preferably multiple times, before it closes December 10, 2017.

[post_title] => Hidden Treasures [post_excerpt] => The Gilded Age of Drawing in America, now on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents three dozen remarkable and rarely seen drawings by artists, both famous and lesser known. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => gilded-age-drawing-america-review [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-05 17:16:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-05 21:16:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=28615 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28356 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2017-08-29 12:08:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-29 16:08:17 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_28441" align="alignright" width="400"]art student Sherry Camhy, The Writer's Hands, graphite on paper.[/caption]

For as long as I can remember, I have been drawing on any available surface, from the walls of my bedroom to the margins of my math books. When I started at the Art Students League, I was, as they say, a “babe in the woods.” Thinking back on my experiences as a student, instructor, and above all, as an artist, I understand more about the process of learning to draw. I would like to share some of those insights with you.

1. The Art Students League is an exceptional school: it allows each student to choose what classes to take, but what you learn, what you give and get from the experience, is up to you. It is a community of artists of all ages, at all levels of skill, from all over the world. What a great opportunity to get to know and learn from people who also love art.

2. Whether you have never drawn or drawn all of your life, have never taken a class or have studied in many other places, choose to do what you love. Give yourself permission to be an artist.

3. Don’t think you have to wait until you have totally conquered drawing to try painting or sculpture. The three inform each other. Working from observation and from imagination enrich each other as well. Studying abstraction can be incredibly helpful to developing your understanding of values, edges, color, and composition, no matter what approach to art you are considering.

4. Different teachers can have very different concepts of art. Don’t lock yourself in. Explore many. Beware of classes where all of the students’ work looks the same as the instructor’s. Learn what you need to know and move on. Ask yourself continually throughout your education what you want or need to know to create art based on your own vision.

[caption id="attachment_28440" align="alignleft" width="400"] Sherry Camhy, Figure Study, five minute sketch, graphite on page of an old French anatomy book.[/caption]

5. When someone new enters my class and asks, “How should I start?” I usually say, “Just start.” It might be easier for both of us if I simply said, “Do this! With that!” But in the long run, it is more important to understand where you are and then talk about where you would like to go and how to get there.

6. Asking questions is important but so is questioning the answers, even mine. Asking “How?” often only leads to skillful imitation. Asking “Why?” may reveal the information necessary for you to be free to choose your own solution.

7. More practicing does not necessarily make for more progress. Perpetual practice doing short poses is an important, freeing, and positively addictive habit but doing longer poses and attempting to finish an image helps you to get to another level. With more time, details, like hands, feet, and noses can be dealt with and conquered, once and for all. Then, surprisingly, short poses will flow ever faster and with even more confidence.

8. Posing breaks are useful for seeing how much you remember of a pose, how far you can take a drawing on your own. Turn your work upside down. Look at it from a distance. Consider continuing to work on the drawing on your kitchen table.

9. Your drawing should always be yours. Placing tracing paper on an image allows corrections, additions, and alternative ideas to be explored on that surface without you or your instructor altering the original image. If there is something you don’t like, change it. If there is something wrong, fix it. Finish it. Try it again on a different textured, value, or colored surface, or in a different medium. Make it the best it can be. Each time you take the time to do this, your work will take a giant step forward.

[caption id="attachment_28439" align="alignright" width="399"] Sherry Camhy, The Artist’s Eye, graphite on paper.[/caption]

10. Understanding information about traditional and contemporary concepts of art, line, value, edges, materials, surfaces, composition, and color makes it possible for you, as an artist, not to be limited by what you don’t know but free to decide what you want to do with greater understanding. There are many excellent books on anatomy, drawing, painting, and materials that contain valuable information that even Leonardo da Vinci would have been thrilled to be able to study. If you have an anatomy book, bring it to class. Use it to figure out what this or that form actually is. There are many magazines and books about art freely available in libraries, museums and the ASL library on the 2½ floor.

11. Throughout art history, artists have come to very different answers to the same questions. Raphael painted a world filled with color bathed in light. Caravaggio filled his paintings with the drama of forms cloaked in darkness.

Look at reproductions of old masters and the work of contemporary artists. Try choosing one and copying it the same size as the print you are looking at. Learn from the best. Work directly from the real thing. Slow down and step into the mind of an artist whose work you love as well as those whose work you hate. At the Metropolitan Museum, you can contact their Study Room for Drawings and Prints, make an appointment and copy from a real Leonardo Da Vinci, Degas, Seurat, and many other priceless works of art. It’s free.

12. There are many skills and ideas to be learned from other artists, both from their artwork and sketchbooks as well as from their writings. There are many art books that reveal factual information about subjects such as anatomy and many, many “How to” books. But although studying these is invaluable, it is not enough. A skillful pianist can learn to play all of the notes accurately, but a great musician is one who adds magic to a performance by masterful interpretation of the score through nuanced phrasing and a dynamic, a sensitive touch that comes from within. Similarly, a skilled draughtsman can learn to draw a perfectly accurate rendering, but perfect can be perfectly boring. It is an artist’s unique way of seeing, understanding, feeling, responding, expressing and communicating that adds the timeless magic to an image.

“It is only when what can be taught is working in perfect harmony with what cannot be taught that a work of art results.” Harold Speed, 1873

13. Art is about looking, seeing, feeling, thinking, learning, and growing.  It is about making images that say something that cannot be said in words. There is no absolutely right or wrong way. Dare to do it your way. Finding what you want to say and how you want to say it is what being an artist is about. Enjoy the search. Frederick Franck expressed the frustration, the excitement and the joy of the process when he wrote,

I tried to calculate how many thousands of "nudes" I must have drawn through the years, how many thrown away, although each one had been done in that exhilaration mixed with despair, that kind of trance    of seeing Life become flesh … it is simply the living eye seeing, the living hand drawing: Life drawing Life. —Frederick Franck, Life Drawing Life

14. When is a piece of work finished?  It does not necessarily need to be perfect or perfectly rendered or full of details. It is done when you, the artist, feel what needed to be said is said, and you are confident that there is nothing extraneous or distracting from that statement. When you do something you like, date it, take care of it, crop it, frame it, hang it on your wall. Think about sharing what you have learned and what you have to say. Think about exhibiting it and maybe even selling your artwork.

15. Carry a sketchbook. Don’t leave home without one. Draw in the park. Draw on the train. Left your sketchbook at home? Take photos with your phone. Proper use of your own photo reference is not a sin. Neither is drawing on your iPad. Up in the middle of the night? Draw your dreams. Draw, draw, and draw! That is what being an artist is about—it is about being you.

[post_title] => Advice for the Beginning Art Student [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's fifteen suggestions for finding your path as an artist. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => art-student [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-29 12:26:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-29 16:26:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=28356 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25786 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2017-03-09 13:49:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-09 18:49:54 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_25788" align="aligncenter" width="923"]Sherry Camhy silverpoint Marbury Sherry Camhy, Becoming, 2017, silver, gold, and copper, 15¾ x 19¾ in. "Becoming," Camhy explains, "was inspired by the beauty of the morning mist on the trees I can see from my window, and my belief in metalpoint’s ability to capture that light. Metalpoint is a medium of becoming. The silver, gold, and copper tarnish with time to reveal the subtle hues that echo the warm tones of the buds on the bare branches as winter turns to spring. As light moves across the metal marks, they reflect the movement of the changing light of the day. The birds will return to their nest and life will begin again."[/caption]

Argentum: Contemporary Silverpoint will be on view at Marbury Gallery (26 Gramercy Park South) from April 28 through May 12, 2017. The exhibition's curator, Lauren Amalia Redding, has selected twenty-five nationally-recognized metalpoint artists including Art Students League instructors Sherry Camhy and Dan Thompson as well as many other ASL artists, including Dennis Angel, James Xavier Barbour, Lisa Bartolozzi, Noah Buchanan, Lauren Caldarola, Harvey Citron, Casey Concelmo, Jeannine Cook, Diana Corvelle, Steven DaLuz, Randall DiGiuseppe, Lori Field, Evan Kitson, Sam Knecht, Aimi Li, Shanga Manning, Tom Mazzullo, Mary Anne McCarthy, Lauren Amalia Redding, Raphael Sassi, Edward Schmidt, Laura Shechter, Ben Shechter (1940-2016), Cheryl Wheat, and Joseph Ventura. The opening reception is scheduled for Saturday, April 29, from 6:00–9:00 PM. 

[post_title] => Sherry Camhy in Upcoming Silverpoint Exhibition [post_excerpt] => Argentum: Contemporary Silverpoint is a group exhibition that will be on view at Marbury Gallery from April 28 through May 12, 2017. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => silverpoint-marbury-sherry-camhy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-29 12:51:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-29 16:51:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=25786 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25411 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2017-02-10 11:11:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-10 16:11:24 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_25412" align="aligncenter" width="887"]The Figurative Artist's Handbook Sherry Camhy, Marty's Father, 2004, graphite on rough paper, 30 x 40 in.[/caption] Paintings and drawings by many Art Students League instructors, past and present, are included in Robert Zeller's forthcoming The Figurative Artist's Handbook: A Contemporary Guide to Figure Drawing, Painting, and Composition, including Steven Assael, George Bellows, Thomas Hart Benton, George Bridgman, Sherry Camhy, Nelson Shanks, Sharon Sprung, Dan Thompson, and Jason Yarmosky.  A "practical how-to guide" of technical instruction for both beginning and advanced artists, this three-hundred page volume will be released March 28, 2017. [post_title] => Art Students League Instructors in The Figurative Artist's Handbook [post_excerpt] => The Figurative Artist's Handbook, by Robert Zeller, includes artwork by nine Art Students League instructors, past and present. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-figurative-artists-handbook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-05 14:35:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-05 18:35:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=25411 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25374 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-02-08 13:29:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-08 18:29:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_25388" align="aligncenter" width="793"]Sherry Camhy Madrid workshop Sherry Camhy, Sunset, in progress, pigment and pastel on black paper, 60 x 120 in.[/caption] "Art in Madrid with Sherry Camhy" is a six-day workshop, offered this spring through 1WorldArtTravel, May 28 through June 2, 2017. The package includes an instructed workshop and entrance fee to museums. The deadline is March 15, 2017. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy's Madrid Workshop [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy will be teaching a six-day workshop in Madrid this spring. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-madrid-workshop [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-11 14:41:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-11 18:41:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=25374 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24990 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2017-01-02 14:31:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-02 19:31:15 [post_content] =>

The 19th annual Postcards from the Edge, organized by Visual AIDS and hosted by Metro Pictures (519 West 24th St.), is a three-day AIDS benefit, scheduled for January 13–15, 2017. Over 1500 postcard-size artworks by established and emerging artists, including many Art Student League members, will be on sale. All are hung anonymously. All are $85 each. Sherry Camhy’s Chava is part of the silent auction of larger work offered online for bidding at Paddle8.com, beginning January 2, 2017. All proceeds support the work of Visual Aids, “because AIDS is not over."

[caption id="attachment_24992" align="aligncenter" width="271"]Sherry Camhy AIDS benefit Sherry Camhy, Chava, 2016, artist's proof, hand-worked digital monoprint.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy Participates in AIDS Benefit [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's Chava will be offered in a silent auction to support the work of Visual AIDS. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-aids-benefit [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-02 14:37:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-02 19:37:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=24990 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24846 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2016-12-15 12:54:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-15 17:54:46 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_24869" align="alignright" width="452"]Ralph Alfred Blakelock Robert Alfred Blakelock, Shanties, Seventh Avenue and Fifty-Fifth Street, undated, oil on canvas, 
16 1/4 x 24 3/8 in.[/caption] After many years of lingering backstage, with only sporadic moments of applause, Ralph Albert Blakelock has re-emerged into the spotlight. Questroyal Fine Art's recent exhibition, Ralph Albert Blakelock: The Great Mad Genius Returns, and its companion catalogue, have offered art historians and artists alike an opportunity to reappraise Blakelock’s pivotal role in the evolution of twentieth-century art in America. Blakelock (1847–1919) broke the conventions of the Hudson River School and pushed past the limits of Impressionism to lay the foundations for Abstract Expressionism. Blakelock was a quintessentially American artist. He was born in 1847, in a crowded tenement building at 166 Christopher Street, in New York City. He began his life living a borderline existence between poverty and middle-class respectability but rapidly became an accomplished musician and a member of the choir of the Episcopal Church. He developed into a respected painter whose work was exhibited at the National Academy. He abandoned studies at the Free Academy of the City of New York (now City College) to become a full-time, self-taught artist, eventually sharing space in the Tenth Street Studio Building, the residence of William Merritt Chase, Fredric Church, and dozens of other artists. There, he painted oil sketches of shanties near Manhattan’s 59th Street and in Harlem with expressive bold brushstrokes in moody, modulated tones. [caption id="attachment_24849" align="alignleft" width="446"]Ralph Alfred Blakelock Ralph Alfred Blakelock, Indian Encampment at Twilight, undated, oil on canvas, 16 x 24 1/16 in. Private Collection.[/caption] Unlike many American artists of the time, Blakelock never studied art in Europe. He instead traveled into the wilderness of the American West, seeking to find his own voice, which he did. He dwelt among Native Americans and painted images like the Indian Encampment at Twilight, which depicted indigenous peoples living in harmony with the environment. Blakelock's landscapes evolved into images that were no longer just about depicting a particular place but rather about being in a particular place at a particular moment, about using paint to abstractly portray a subjective emotional experience, about a state of mind. Raymond Wyer, an art critic of the era, believed Blakelock much more than a landscape painter, writing, "No artist has used the landscape as means to an end more than he.” Eventually returning to New York, Blakelock married and struggled to support nine children as a painter. After the birth of his fifth child and the death of his two-year-old daughter, Blakelock spent some time in the Flatbush Insane Asylum, the first of a series of mental breakdowns. These intermittent periods of depression alternated with periods of great creativity. [caption id="attachment_24853" align="alignright" width="400"]Ralph Alfred Blakelock Ralph Alfred Blakelock, Moonlight Sonata, about 1889–92, oil on canvas, 30⅜ x 22 in. The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston[/caption] After an evening of listening to Beethoven, Blakelock painted his Moonlight Sonata, which now hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. It is a haunting example of Blakelock’s Swedenborgian pantheistic view of nature evident in his landscapes and moon paintings, which became recurring themes in his artwork. Art critics wrote that his paintings inspired music in the souls of their viewers. Blakelock described his creative process in exactly the reverse order: music inspired his paintings. With brushstrokes moving to a rhythm of his own, with colors in harmony with the melodies of his moods, Blakelock’s images emerged from a hard, dry silvery ground, an underpainting consisting of plaster, French chalk, and a talc-type gesso. His daughter, Ruth, reported that he applied the mixture with uneven strokes, rubbed it dry to eliminate the rougher ridges, and ran water over the surface to produce a smooth but random, textured result. He applied countless layers of opaque and transparent pigments combined with oil and a specially-devised “Blakelock” varnish, allowing them to congeal into gummy over-glazed textures. He rubbed, flattened, and scraped with a painting knife and ground the results with a pumice stone until a hint of the original impasto was visible. On that middle tone base, he painted darker and scratched lighter in the additive process he preferred. Other artists rushed to purchase the “Blakelock” formula varnish. Blakelock fought with his paint until his images magically evolved into the mystical, musical nocturnes of silence he sought. He fought with his paint until the images of his imagination finally shimmered with an intimate, internal realism all their own. “In his landscapes," observed Blakelock scholar Norman A. Geske, "the skies, trees and waters became abstractions of these natural elements. Color, drawing and texture, light and space become self sufficient elements in his work.” Blakelock originally sold his Brook by Moonlight to a collector for $500. In 1916, it was purchased at auction for $20,000, at the time, the highest price ever paid for the work of a living American painter. More than 2,500 curious viewers flocked to attend the first two days of a record-breaking exhibition of Blakelock’s work at the Reinhardt Gallery, in New York. [caption id="attachment_24874" align="alignleft" width="450"]Ralph Alfred Blakelock Ralph Albert Blakelock, Indian Encampment at Sunset, undated, oil on canvas, 20 x 30 in.[/caption] In spite of his sporadic emotional instability, Blakelock was present at the opening. The event’s self-serving sponsor, Beatrice Van Rensselaer Adams, had arranged for Blakelock to be properly groomed and dressed in the Brooks Brothers attire she provided for him. She arranged for him to be picked up and transported to the event to ensure his timely arrival. Blakelock played his part admirably. He was reported to be appropriately charming and brilliant from the beginning to the end of the evening, when Adams promptly returned him to the Middletown Hospital for the Insane where he had resided for the past fifteen years of his life for treatment of dementia praecox (schizophrenia). While Blakelock was in and out of mental hospitals for the remainder of his life, his artwork, as well as countless copies and forgeries of his work, continued to be sought after by collectors. Notwithstanding Blakelock’s growing fame, neither the artist, his estranged wife, nor any of his nine children received any proceeds from the sale of his artwork. Blakelock and his family lived out their lives in obscurity and in extreme poverty. The romantic saga of Blakelock’s life both adds and distracts from an appreciation of his art. Blakelock implored people to judge his images on their own merit, but it is often impossible to appraise the consequences of either or both those factors on an artist’s life and work. Genius? Madman? Perhaps, the answer does not matter. Blakelock was a 'painter’s painter. The emotional impact and the power of the art Blakelock created are undeniable–unforgettable.
Ralph Albert Blakelock: The Great Mad Genius Returns was on view at Questroyal Fine Art, LLC from November 11 through December 10, 2016. [post_title] => Spotlight on Ralph Alfred Blakelock [post_excerpt] => Blakelock fought with his paint until his images magically evolved into the mystical, musical nocturnes of silence he sought. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ralph-alfred-blakelock-questroyal [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://www.toledomuseum.org/2015/10/30/artwork-of-the-week-october-30/ [post_modified] => 2016-12-15 13:01:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-15 18:01:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=24846 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24575 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2016-11-02 13:00:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-02 17:00:35 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_24577" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Sherry Camhy The Figurative Artist's Handbook Sherry Camhy, Father Time, 2007, graphite on black, 15 x 30 in.[/caption]

The Figurative Artist’s Handbook: A Contemporary Guide to Figurative Drawing, Painting, and Composition by Robert Zeller will be published November 22, 2016. Six of Sherry Camhy's drawings are featured in the volume alongside those of John Currin, J.C. Leyendecker, Maxwell Parrish, and Frank Frazetta. 

[post_title] => Camhy in Figurative Artist's Handbook [post_excerpt] => The Figurative Artist’s Handbook: A Contemporary Guide to Figurative Drawing, Painting, and Composition by Robert Zeller, forthcoming from Monacelli Press, includes drawings by Sherry Camhy. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-figurative-artist-handbook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-11-02 15:48:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-02 19:48:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=24575 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24019 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-09-12 06:56:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-12 10:56:13 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy's "Material World" column for Drawing magazine explores ways to get the most out of drawing media. For the Fall 2006 issue Camhy has published "The Nuts and Bolts of Mechanical Pencils" (read here). The article offers an incisive history of graphite and an exploration of how mechanical pencils can be used alongside traditional pencils. Reproduced with the article are two portrait drawings by fellow Art Students League instructor Costa Vavagiakis and Art Students League student Mark Gonzalez. [caption id="attachment_24055" align="aligncenter" width="490"]Mark Gonzales, Self-Portrait, 2016. Mechanical pencil (0.7 2B), 7 x 5 in. Sherry Camhy Mechanical Pencils Mark Gonzales, Self-Portrait, 2016.
Mechanical pencil (0.7 2B), 7 x 5 in.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy on Mechanical Pencils [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's "Material World" column for the Fall 2006 issue of Drawing is "The Nuts and Bolts of Mechanical Pencils." [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => camhy-mechancial-pencil [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-19 17:36:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-19 21:36:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=24019 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23798 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2016-08-25 16:30:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-25 20:30:29 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy has published Robert Beverly Hale Lecture Notes. The hardcover volume contains one hundred unedited pages from the sketchbook Camhy created as Hale's afternoon class monitor in 1980. The pages include detailed notations of Hale’s anatomy lectures, her own studies of his demonstration diagrams, and additional anatomy information. "Robert Beverly Hale’s lectures were not just about anatomy. They were interspersed with his insights into art and life, which he expressed through humorous asides and inspiring recitations of poetry," Camhy explains. Also included are snapshots of Hale and his drawings. The book is for anyone interested in understanding more about one of the Art Students League's most influential anatomists. On November 18 at 12:30 pm in the Art Students League's Phyllis Harriman Mason Gallery, Camhy will be giving a free talk and signing copies of her book. If you are unable to attend, please email her your experiences with and memories of Robert Beverly Hale: sherrycamhy@gmail.com. 20160823_212611 [post_title] => Sherry Camhy's New Book [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy has just published Robert Beverly Hale Lecture Notes. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-hale-book [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-11-08 08:24:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-08 13:24:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=23798 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23665 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-08-13 09:56:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-13 13:56:46 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy writes Drawing magazine's "Material World" column. Her latest article, "Sketchbooks Then and Now," which you can read here, was published in the Spring 2016 issue. Other articles by Camhy are available to read and print on her website. Sherry Camhy sketchbooks [post_title] => Sherry Camhy on Sketchbooks [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's article about sketchbooks for Drawing magazine. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-sketchbooks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-19 18:46:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-19 22:46:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=23665 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23382 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2016-07-26 13:40:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-26 17:40:17 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_23387" align="alignright" width="350"]Back to the Drawing Board Wilhelm von Kügelgen, Portrait of a Young Man, mid-19th century. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on brown-grey paper,The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, the Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 2012. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Wilhelm von Kügelgen, Portrait of a Young Man, mid-19th century. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on brown-grey paper, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, the Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 2012. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption] At the top of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's grand staircase off to the left is a passageway gallery that contains a rotating exhibition of drawings and prints. Many people hurry past these small precious works of art without a glance on their way to a blockbuster painting exhibition at the other side of the building. But I always stop and look at the drawings in wonder. Drawings reproduced in books or viewed on a computer screen can never come close to what it is like to see the real work. It is difficult to judge the relative size, color, and range of values unless the work is viewed in person. The nuance of line and the texture of the surface cannot really be sensed and felt. Five drawings recently on view at the Metropolitan Museum took my breath away. Looking at these drawings I am able to travel back in time to communicate with artists living centuries ago, and I can ask them, How did you do that? Why did you do that? Their answers are there in the work, if only I take the time to really see and understand them. I frequently visit the museum in search of finding answers to problems I am having in my own work. After unsuccessfully fighting to get the back eye of a three-quarter view portrait correct, I went to the Metropolitan Museum in search of help. I found that help in Portrait of a Young Man by Wilhelm von Kügelgen, a mid-nineteenth century German artist. [caption id="attachment_23385" align="alignleft" width="351"]Back to the Drawing Board Georges Seurat, Embroidery; The Artist's Mother, 1882–83. Conté crayon on Michallet paper, 12 5/16 x 9 7/16 in. Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1951; acquired from The Museum of Modern Art, Lillie P. Bliss Collection. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Georges Seurat, Embroidery; The Artist's Mother, 1882–83. Conté crayon on Michallet paper, 12 5/16 x 9 7/16 in. Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1951; acquired from The Museum of Modern Art, Lillie P. Bliss Collection. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption] By taking the time to describe in words what I was actually seeing, I gained some valuable insights into how I could do it better myself. I noted how von Kügelgen solved the problem of the troublesome back eye by first using a carefully observed line to indicate the edge of that side of the face. His line emerges crisply from behind the young man’s wispy hair. It is ever so slightly softened and lightened and then hardened again as it descends down the round shape of the forehead to become a smidgen sharper. Yet it slides over the bony brow ridge disappearing for a tiny bit behind the hairs of the eyebrow.  Continuing further on its path, the line clearly defines the side of the eye socket ridge that keeps the eye tucked safely under its structure. Emerging from under the ledge of the eye socket, another mark suggests that the upper lid is a little larger than the eye, just big enough to blink over the round eyeball but snug enough to hold the eye in place. There is a tiny black chalk stroke, easy to miss, but crucial to the anatomical sense of the drawing, just to the left of the iris that shows the upper eye lid continuing beyond the lower lid as the two join together to hold the eye as it moves focusing here or there. [caption id="attachment_23383" align="alignright" width="373"]Back to the Drawing Board Theo Van Rysselberghe, Intimacy, 1890. Conté crayon; framing line in conté crayon (or graphite?), by the artist,17 1/16 × 20 in. Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, 2015. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Theo Van Rysselberghe, Intimacy, 1890. Conté crayon; framing line in conté crayon (or graphite?), by the artist, 17 1/16 × 20 in. Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, 2015. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption] The upper lid covers a bit of the top part of the iris and the lower a little less. Although the lashes of the upper lid, the lid ledge itself, and the upper part of the eyeball are in shadow, the thinner lower lid faces up and catches light. The iris and the pupil are not exactly target-shaped circles but are slightly narrower ovals tilted back and downward. By carefully observing what I was actually seeing in von Kügelgen's drawing and describing it to myself, I was able to understand some of the specific techniques he used to deal with the difficult job of convincingly rendering that eye. Although he accomplished that feat with carefully rendered lines and a delicately restrained use of black and white chalk, I began to feel more confident about using what I had learned from him in my own work in my own way. I often think about drawing as painting with a pencil. The perceptive curators placed five very different approaches to drawing near each other, likely to raise some questions about the nature of a beautifully-rendered or painterly-drawn image. [caption id="attachment_23384" align="alignleft" width="351"]Back to the Drawing Board Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Portrait of Madame Paul Meurice, née Palmyre Granger, ca. 1845–50. Graphite on wove paper, 22 × 17 5/8 in. Purchase, Harris Brisbane Dick, Louis V. Bell, and Harry G. Sperling Funds, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, and Leon D. Black Gift, 2016. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Portrait of Madame Paul Meurice, née Palmyre Granger, ca. 1845–50. Graphite on wove paper, 22 × 17 5/8 in. Purchase, Harris Brisbane Dick, Louis V. Bell, and Harry G. Sperling Funds, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, and Leon D. Black Gift, 2016. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption] The intensely dark Embroidery, The Artist’s Mother, rendered by George Seurat with Conté crayon, a square stick of ground graphite combined with charcoal, posed the question of how dark and totally tonal an artist could go and still make an image discernible to the human eye. Artist Paul Signac wrote that works on paper like this one were “the most beautiful painter’s drawings that ever existed.” Seurat’s drawings have always fascinated me. No line. All tone. Painterly. When I find an artist whose concepts about drawing are akin to my own inclinations, the experience supports my convictions and gives me the reassurance and the courage to push further in that direction in my own way. In Intimacy, Theo Van Rysselberghe used a technique similar to Seurat's in Embroidery, The Artist’s Mother. Both images picture a woman engaged in the female task of needlework.  In contrast to Seurat’s dark image, Van Rysselberghe explored as light as possible a range of values to create a feeling of luminosity within a complex composition of forms. Both artists placed one value against another to achieve their goals. Neither resorted to the use of much or any line. On the other hand, line was the dominant choice of expression of Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres in his Portrait on Madame Paul Meurice, nee Palmyre Granger. The centered visage’s almost symmetrical features, the simply-stated sinuous, graphite line is elegant and perfect to express the quiet grace of this gentle young woman. The off-center placement and the dramatic horizontal slashing lines of Käthe Kollwitz's Self-Portrait, Turned Slightly to the Left tells a completely different story from all of these other portraits in style and intent. In von Kügelgen's portrait, the young boy’s eyes look shyly down away. Käthe Kollwitz’s eyes look straight ahead directly at us. Both artists use totally different styles of drawing, but both reveal the same intense knowledge of the anatomy of the eye. [caption id="attachment_23386" align="aligncenter" width="629"]Back to the Drawing Board Käthe Kollwitz, Self-Portrait, turned slightly to the left, ca. 1893. Pen and different shades of gray-black ink, 6 9/16 x 11 7/16 in. The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 2006. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Käthe Kollwitz, Self-Portrait, turned slightly to the left, ca. 1893. Pen and different shades of gray-black ink, 6 9/16 x 11 7/16 in. The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 2006. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.[/caption] The drawing and print gallery at the Metropolitan Museum of Art offers a rotating exhibition of some of the best work to be enjoyed and studied. Why not take the time to look? [post_title] => Back to the Drawing Board [post_excerpt] => When I visit the Metropolitan Museum, I am able to travel back in time to communicate with artists living centuries ago, and ask them, How did you do that? Why did you do that? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-met-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-21 08:20:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-21 12:20:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=23382 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17846 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-01-26 12:14:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-26 17:14:03 [post_content] => [portfolio_slideshow id="20852"] Postcards from the Edge is an art auction of over 1500 postcard-sized works of art, by both established and emerging artists, the proceeds benefiting Visual Aids, an organization dedicated to fighting "AIDS by provoking dialogue, supporting HIV+ artists and preserving a legacy." The three-day event, at Sikkema Jenkins & Co (530 West 22nd St.), begins with a preview party on January 29, followed by two days, January 30 and 31, of the benefit sale. Sherry Camhy's Adam is included as part of the online auction at artnet.com. Many of Camhy's students have also donated work: Jane Atlas, Angela Barbalance, Eric Brown, Nancee Brown, Robert Buckley, Mary Grace Concannon, Matt Feinstein, Julie Garfield, Margret Golden, Caroline Grossman, Donna Livingstone, Marie-Paule Martin, Elizabeth Rothschild, Carol Savopoulos, Helen Stutz, Ellen Wahl, and Blake Zoephel..
Carol Savopoulos, Not about the Bling Sherry Camhy, Adam Nancee Brown, Untitled Marie-Paule Martin, Autumn in the Park
[post_title] => 18th Annual Postcards from the Edge [post_excerpt] => Postcards from the Edge is an art auction of over 1500 postcard-sized works of art, by both established and emerging artists, the proceeds of which benefit Visual Aids. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => postcards-from-the-edge-2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-13 10:00:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-13 14:00:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=17846 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17445 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-11-19 09:03:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-19 14:03:09 [post_content] => Lustrous Lines: Contemporary Metalpoint Drawings is an exhibition of work by forty-three artists from the US, UK, and Australia. Included in the show, which opens at the Morris Graves Museum of Art (Eureka, CA) November 21 and continues through January 3, 2016, is Sherry Camhy's Study of a Young Woman and Wendy Shalen's Cycle. [caption id="attachment_17446" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Study of a Young Woman, 2015. Silver and gold point, 40 x 30 in. Sherry Camhy, Study of a Young Woman, 2015.
Silver- and goldpoint, 40 x 30 in.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17449" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Wendy Shalen, Cycle, 2012. Silverpoint on prepared pink-toned paper, 20 x 16 in. Wendy Shalen, Cycle, 2012.
Silverpoint on prepared pink-toned paper, 20 x 16 in.[/caption] [post_title] => On Exhibition: Camhy and Shalen in Lustrous Lines [post_excerpt] => Lustrous Lines: Contemporary Metalpoint Drawings is an exhibition of work by forty-three artists from the US, UK, and Australia. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => on-exhibition-camhy-and-shalen-in-lustrous-lines [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:21:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:21:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=17445 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17363 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-11-13 10:30:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-13 15:30:08 [post_content] => Six figure drawings by Sherry Camhy are part of a four-day pop-up exhibition, A Celebration of Life Drawing, at the Jay Gould Townhouse (179 Sullivan Street). The show, curated by computer artist Jeff Weiner, also includes paintings by Janet A. Cook and John Wellington, the sculptures of Leah Poller, and Weiner's own digital images. Everyone who attends the event is welcome to sketch from three live models. Sketching is available on November 13 and 14, 5 to 7 p.m. and November 15, 2 to 4 p.m. The exhibition is open November 13 and 14, 1 to 8 p.m. and November 15, 1 to 6 p.m. Images of the event and exhibited works can be viewed at TheGreatNude.tv. [caption id="attachment_17364" align="aligncenter" width="561"]Sherry Camhy, Torso Series, Youth, 2015. Graphite, 40 x 30 in. Sherry Camhy, Torso Series, Youth, 2015.
Graphite, 40 x 30 in.[/caption] [post_title] => On Exhibition: A Celebration of Life Drawing [post_excerpt] => A Celebration of Life Drawing is a group exhibition of figurative artworks and life drawing events at the Jay Gould Townhouse. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => on-exhibition-a-celebration-of-life-drawing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:21:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:21:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=17363 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17027 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-10-15 12:15:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-15 16:15:19 [post_content] => My Aunt Helen never had a doll. She was one of many children in a family, and there was no money to spare. She loved art but there was no way she could become an artist. There was something about the doll I saw in the thrift shop window. The way her broken hand was resting near her heart made me think about my aunt and her unfulfilled dreams. It made me dwell on how economics and technology have separated the hand of the artist from the soul of the artist. I took the doll home and placed her near my easel. I named her Minerva and drew her portrait in the archaic medium of metalpoint. I chose metalpoint both because of its history as an old master’s medium and its potential future as one that has recently been rediscovered by contemporary artists. Aunt Helen’s Doll was created with 14-carat gold and sterling sliver. The gold was used for the darker values.  Those will remain permanently as they are now. The silver lines will tarnish with age, growing ever more luminous with time. Minerva was named after the goddess of art and will always be a work in progress, growing ever more intriguing as the years go by. Aunt Helen’s Doll is now part of the permanent collection of The Arkansas Art Center (Little Rock, AR). [caption id="attachment_17029" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll, 2007. Silver on prepared paper, 12x16. Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll, 2007.
Silver on prepared paper, 16 x 12 in.[/caption] [post_title] => Camhy's Silverpoint Drawing Accessioned [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy’s silverpoint drawing has been accessioned into the permanent collection of the Arkansas Arts Center Foundation. Read the story behind the work. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => camhys-silverpoint-drawing-accessioned [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:19:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:19:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=17027 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16758 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-09-14 22:16:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-15 02:16:35 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy’s installation Another Time, Another Place is part of the Katonah Museum Artist Association Members juried exhibition, Time and Place, which opens at the Hammond Museum (North Salem, MA), on September 16. The show includes work by thirty-three artists selected by independent curator Sarah Corona and continues through October 17, 2015. [caption id="attachment_16764" align="aligncenter" width="503"]sherry camhy hammond museum Sherry Camhy's installation Another Time, Another Place[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy at the Hammond Museum [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy’s installation Another Time, Another Place is part of the Katonah Museum Artist Association Members juried exhibition, Time and Place, opening September 16 at the Hammond Museum. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-hammond-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-26 10:13:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-26 14:13:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=16758 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15371 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-05-29 10:07:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-29 14:07:02 [post_content] => Little Rock, Arkansas, is celebrating the art of silverpoint with talks at the Arkansas Center for the Arts and two simultaneous gallery exhibitions on either side of town that feature work in the medium. Sherry Camhy’s Portrait of a Young Woman and Portrait of an Aging Woman from her "Classical Sculpture Series" can be seen at the Greg Thompson Art Gallery and her Music and Poetry, studies from the same series, are on view at the Hearne Fine Art Gallery, through June 27, 2015.   [caption id="attachment_15401" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Portrait of a Young Woman. Sherry Camhy, Portrait of a Young Woman.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_15403" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Portrait of an Aging Woman. Sherry Camhy, Portrait of an Aging Woman.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_15379" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Music. Sherry Camhy, Music.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_15378" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Poetry. Sherry Camhy, Poetry.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy: Two Silverpoint Exhibitions [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy will be exhibiting silverpoint drawings in two Arkansas galleries. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-two-silverpoint-exhibitions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:13:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:13:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=15371 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14576 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2015-04-21 11:55:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-21 15:55:11 [post_content] => Before pencils and paper, Leonardo Da Vinci, Michaelangelo, and many other artists drew with lead, silver, gold, and other metal points to create timeless studies on small specially-prepared surfaces. Silver points were the most often chosen for drawing. Placed in a stylus, they were used to make studies of delicately fine, light, permanent lines that darkened into a luminous warm hue as the silver tarnished with age. Opening May 3 at the National Gallery of Art, in Washington DC, is Drawing with Silver and Gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns, a comprehensive metal point exhibition of ninety drawings from the Middle Ages to the present. With its focus on older work, the exhibition contains only ten images created since 1900. Co-curators Sherry Camhy and Jillian Russo conceived a complementary show, The Silverpoint Exhibition, as a celebration of some outstanding work in silverpoint created at the Art Students League since 1948.[portfolio_slideshow width="636" height="500" id="21099"] The artists in the exhibition have been attracted to this archaic medium's purity while pushing beyond of its former limitations, working as large as they choose and on surfaces that allow for erasing and the use of mixed media. The Silverpoint Exhibition, an exhibition of contemporary silverpoint drawings, includes work by Steven Assael, Cara Boyle, Sherry Camhy, Mary Grace Concannon, George Corbin, Harvey Dinnerstein, Lois Dinnerstein, Fioretti, Mark Gonzales, Richard Husson, James Melone, Maria Mottola, Lauren Amalia Redding, Ephraim Rubenstein, Sheldon Schultz, Wendy Shalen, Burton Silverman, Joel Spector, Aidan Terry, Dan Thompson Ever Blanco Valverde, Costa Vavagiakis, Lea Colie Wight, Jason Yarmosky, and Blake Zoephel. The show continues in the Art Students League's main office gallery through May 31, 2015. An opening reception is scheduled for May 7, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Steven Assael, Torso, 2013. Silverpoint on paper, 17 x 12¾ in. Ephraim Rubenstein, Narcissus, 2006. Silverpoint on prepared paper, 30 x 22½ in. Joseph Feury, Sunflowers,
[post_title] => On View: The Silverpoint Exhibition [post_excerpt] => Before pencils and paper, Leonardo Da Vinci, Michaelangelo, and many other artists drew with lead, silver, gold, and other metal points to create timeless studies on small specially prepared surfaces. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-silverpoint-exhibition-2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-22 16:07:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-22 20:07:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=14576 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14274 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-04-02 20:48:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-03 00:48:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_14275" align="aligncenter" width="660"]Moses "The image of Moses," explains Sherry Camhy, "is drawn with sterling silver and fourteen and eighteen carat gold. Small lengths of various widths of the metals were cut then carefully shaped and placed in holders of appropriate sizes."[/caption] Sherry Camhy's Moses is included in Women of the BookJewish Women Recording, Reflecting, Revisiting, a visual, interpretive scroll based on the form and content of a traditional Torah scroll created on 54 parchment panels (the number of Torah portions) by 54 Jewish women artists from around the world. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy's Moses [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's Moses is included in Women of the Book, Jewish Women Recording, Reflecting, Revisiting. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhys-moses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-05-24 10:58:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-24 14:58:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=14274 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14132 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-03-17 10:54:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-17 14:54:47 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy’s At a Still Point received first prize for landscape at the 116th Annual Exhibiting Artist Members Exhibition, which continues at The National Arts Club (15 Gramercy Park South, NYC) through March 29, 2015. [caption id="attachment_14134" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, At a Still Point, undated. Oil on canvas, 42 x 36 in. Sherry Camhy, At a Still Point, 2015. Oil on canvas, 42 x 36 in.[/caption] [post_title] => On Exhibition: Sherry Camhy at the National Arts Club [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy’s At a Still Point received first prize for landscape at the 116th Annual Exhibiting Artist Members Exhibition. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => on-exhibition-sherry-camhy-at-the-national-arts-club [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:09:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:09:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=14132 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13515 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2014-12-29 09:24:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-29 14:24:37 [post_content] =>

adam_and_chava

WhatWePrintWhenWePrintAboutLove brings together the work of six artists with diverse approaches to printmaking and love. Sherry Camhy will exhibit images of Adam and Eve. The two prints are framed separately, which allows them to be hung close together, face-to-face, or farther apart, back-to-back, or completely separated as individual entities. Their shifting spatial relationship signifies the fragile phases of love. The exhibition, curated by Katherine Dolgy Ludwig, opens at Ceres Gallery (547 West 27th St., Suite 201) on January 6 and contiues through January 31, 2015. An opening reception is scheduled for January 8, 6 to 8 pm.

[post_title] => Sherry Camhy Prints at Ceres Gallery [post_excerpt] => WhatWePrintWhenWePrintAboutLove brings together the work of six artists with diverse approaches to printmaking and love. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-prints-ceres-gallery [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:06:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:06:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=13515 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12905 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-10-14 12:08:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-14 16:08:35 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_12906" align="aligncenter" width="660"]Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll—III, 2008. Oil on board, 24 x 36 in. Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll—III, 2008. Oil on board, 24 x 36 in.[/caption] Aunt Helen’s Doll III will be one of the three images appearing in the Katonah Museum Artists' Association Artist of the Month online gallery, which will feature Sherry Camhy during November and December 2014. "Aunt Helen’s Doll III was painted directly on an old wooden panel rescued from the basement of the Art Students League of New York," explains Sherry Camhy. "Since the league's founding in 1875, generations of art students have used old boards like this one as a support behind their paintings. When they removed their work, the boards were reused, again and again, by a new crop of artists. Now, it is my turn. Will you be next?" [post_title] => Sherry Camhy's Online Gallery [post_excerpt] => Aunt Helen’s Doll III was painted directly on an old wooden panel rescued from the basement of the Art Students League of New York. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-katonah-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:03:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:03:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=12905 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12793 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-10-10 08:00:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-10 12:00:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_12799" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Cherub–Music Muse. Silver and gold on wood, 15½ x 11½ in. Sherry Camhy, Cherub–Music Muse. <br/>Silver and gold on wood, 15½ x 11½ in.[/caption] Sherry Camhy has been chosen by the Katonah Museum Artists' Association as the Online Gallery Artist of the Month for November and December 2014. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy Is "Artist of the Month" [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-artist-month [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:04:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:04:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=12793 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12209 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2014-09-17 14:40:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-17 18:40:15 [post_content] =>

What does "becoming an artist" mean? Some people simply have an impulse to create. They are artists by nature. Some strive to become skilled artists and enjoy that quest for its own sake. Then there are artists who also want to share something they have created by exhibiting their work. Open juried exhibitions are a way to get started exhibiting your work publicly.

[caption id="attachment_12228" align="alignright" width="393"]Sherry Camhy, Peter Upside Down, 2013. Graphite on paper, 20 x 30 in. Sherry Camhy, Peter Upside Down, 2013. Graphite on paper, 20 x 30 in.[/caption]

Open juried exhibits are exactly what they say they are. They are open to any and all artists—no résumé required. Every effort is made to prevent the exhibition committee and judges from knowing artists' names, so jurying can be impartial. The process creates a level playing field. Unknown talented artists have an opportunity to exhibit their work alongside that of recognized artists.

The focus here is on established open juried exhibition organized by recognized associations of artists such as Allied Artists of America, the Catharine Lorillard Wolfe Association, the National Association of Women Artists, the Pastel Society of America, and the American Watercolor Society. They are held in prestigious locations and designed for artists as an alternative to the world of commercial galleries.

Unlike the gallery system, where a dealer will take fifty percent or more of a sale, many artists' associations take a much smaller commission from sales, or they suggest the artist make a voluntary contribution to the organization. (Exhibited work, however, need not be for sale to be included in an open juried show.) Some organizations ask for an entrance fee to offset the expense of the exhibition and awards; others do not. 

Cash awards given to selected exhibiting artists are often substantial, which, of course, is very nice. Nicer still is the opportunity to exhibit, receive an award, and keep your work. 

[caption id="attachment_12227" align="alignleft" width="283"]Arlene Lieberman, Centered, 2014. Pencil drawing on paper, 20 x 17 in. Arlene Lieberman, Centered, 2014. Pencil drawing on paper, 20 x 17 in.[/caption]

The admission committees and jurors selected by the exhibition associations are individuals who have a significant standing in the art world. Under ordinary circumstances, it would be impossible to get this caliber of tastemaker to look at unknown artists’ work. Frequently, collectors, gallery owners, and curators attend open juried exhibitions in search of new talent. Miracles happen.  

I had never heard of open juried exhibitions until, by chance, I noticed a section in the back of an artists' magazine that listed several of them. I took, what seemed to me at the time, a huge leap of faith. I sent for the information, filled out the entry forms, and mailed them. I did not tell any one what I had done because I was sure my impulsive venture would end in total failure. I waited nervously expecting rejection notices. Instead, acceptances arrived! 

I will never forget the thrill of seeing people stop to look at my drawing hanging on the wall in an exhibition of the Hudson Valley Art Association held in the elegant Gramercy Park brownstone of the National Arts Club.

Over the years, I have received as many rejections as acceptances. Sometimes a work rejected from one exhibition received a first prize in another. One of my drawings rejected many times from several exhibitions is now part of the permanent collection of the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

[caption id="attachment_12226" align="alignright" width="269"]Helen Stutz, Dawn I, 2013. Watercolor, 30 x 22 in. Helen Stutz, Dawn I, 2013. Watercolor, 30 x 22 in.[/caption]

After the thrill of my first acceptance and exhibition in an open juried show, a crucial shift in my attitude toward my own work occurred. Now, when people asked me if my work had ever been exhibited, I could say,  “Yes.” I was no longer regarded by people close to me as a perpetual art student – someone with a pleasant, ladylike hobby. 

Although I continued to enjoy and am still addicted to the process of doing countless random studies, I started to think seriously about what I wanted to say with my skills and how to create completed images of those ideas that would be worthy of exhibition. I began to think of myself truly as an exhibiting artist— a concept I still find a bit scary. 

After having exhibited in dozens of open juried exhibitions, I am now asked to serve as a juror. The position has afforded me new insights into the process.  

Recently, I and two co-jurors selected 195 works from the 540 entries received by the Hudson Valley Art Association. Needless to say, the decision-making process was mind-boggling.

Here are some suggestions to consider when applying for an open juried exhibition:

Read each association’s guide or “prospectus” carefully to understand its goals and the exact requirements for submissions. It was painful to see many excellent pieces of artwork disqualified simply because of application errors.

Submit digital image files that meet the specified requirements for resolution and dimensions. Judges usually rely on digital images to initially cull submissions. During this stage, they rapidly review digital photographs of the works on computer monitors. Some are eliminated simply due to poor image quality.

[caption id="attachment_12225" align="alignleft" width="365"]Sherry Camhy, Peter Upside Down, 2013. Graphite on paper, 20 x 30 in. Wendy Shalen, Mom at 101, 2013. Charcoal on paper, 19 x 26 in.[/caption]

Since each of us knows our own work intimately, it is easy to assume that a viewer will see and understand the image the same way we do. Send in an image that is properly cropped, lighted, color-corrected, and most importantly, sharp.

Though it might be tempting to enhance your image with digital tools, it is not a good strategy. If the real work appears very different when it is delivered, it will probably be rejected. A better approach is to correct the actual work to make it closer to what you really wish it were. Looking at your work in a digital format can often help you to see what is needed to push your work to a higher level. Submit your best work with the best possible digital image of it for the best chance of acceptance.

One of the primary tasks of a selection committee is to decide whether the submitted artwork meets with the exhibition’s goals. If you are a representational artist, it makes no sense to submit work to an abstract, conceptual, installation, or performance-based exhibition or vice versa.

Some wonderful work had to be rejected because it did not meet the Hudson Valley Art Association’s exhibition criteria. Some competent work was turned down because it was too similar to other work. Many excellent images of typical subject matter — winding roads, boats docked at sunset, vases, flowers, fruit, grapes, and portraits — ended up competing against each other for the exhibition's limited wall space.

It was often obvious which artists had studied with the same teachers, and those images also began to compete against each other. The goal of the exhibition was to find from among the submissions the freshest and most personal approaches to traditional concepts.

For me, it was disheartening to see how many submitted images were painstakingly detailed copies of photographs. The use of photo reference is an unfortunate necessity to be handled with discretion as a starting place for inspiration but not as an end in its self. To me, an image that “looks just like a photograph” is not a work of art. It is just an excellent copy of a photograph. I felt work done from life sparkled alongside those images too closely rendered from photo reference. 

If you are thinking about submitting your work to an open juried exhibition, it is a good idea to see what work was accepted for past exhibitions, and, if possible, to attend some of their receptions, which are usually free and open to the public. These can be eye-opening. Artists who attend these events are often happy to answer your questions whether about their work or their experiences exhibiting. 

The images reproduced in this post are by Art Students League artists, both students and instructors, who will be exhibiting in the Hudson Valley Art Association’s Eighty-second Annual Juried Exhibition at the Salmagundi Club. The show opens September 20 with a closing reception on September 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. An online gallery of the show is now up on the association's website.

Comprehensive listings of exhibition opportunities are available on Art Times, ArtShow.com, and OnlineJuriedShows.com, to name a few.

It is not easy to put yourself out there, but it is not as hard as you might think. The rewards are well worth the risks. Give it a try!

[post_title] => Becoming an Artist [post_excerpt] => What does “becoming an artist” mean? Some people simply have an impulse to create. They are artists by nature. Some strive to become skilled artists and enjoy that quest for its own sake. Then there are artists who also want to share something they have created by exhibiting their work. Open juried exhibitions are a way to get started exhibiting your work publicly. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => becoming-artist [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-14 09:22:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-14 13:22:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=12209 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11732 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-07-24 10:53:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-24 14:53:46 [post_content] => Veritas is a painting by Sherry Camhy that will be on view in the Hudson Valley Art Association's 82nd Annual Exhibition, opening at the Salmagundi Club (47 Fifth Avenue, NYC) on September 20. The exhibition, which includes oils, aqua media, pastels, graphics, and sculpture, continues through September 26, 2014, with a reception open to the public that evening, from 5 to 7 p.m. [caption id="attachment_11734" align="aligncenter" width="573"]Hudson Valley Art Association Sherry Camhy, Veritas, 2011. Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 in.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy's Veritas [post_excerpt] => Veritas is a painting by Sherry Camhy that will be on view in the Hudson Valley Art Association's 82nd Annual Exhibition, opening at the Salmagundi Club (47 Fifth Avenue, NYC) on September 20. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hudson-valley-art-association [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-31 11:24:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-31 15:24:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=11732 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11382 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2014-06-23 12:51:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-06-23 16:51:17 [post_content] => Sherry Camhy explores historical and contemporary concepts of pastel drawing and painting in “Pastel Pointers, Past and Present," an article in the Summer 2014 issue of Drawing magazine. [caption id="attachment_11383" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sherry Camhy, Portrait of Julie, 2011. Pan pastel on board. Sherry Camhy, Portrait of Julie (detail), 2011. Pan pastel on board.[/caption] [post_title] => Sherry Camhy on Pastel [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy explores historical and contemporary concepts of pastel drawing and painting in “Pastel Pointers, Past and Present," an article in the Summer 2014 issue of Drawing magazine. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sherry-camhy-pastel [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-11 10:00:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-11 10:00:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=11382 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10205 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-04-18 05:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-18 09:00:53 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10204" align="aligncenter" width="504"]dishman art museum Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll—I, 2008. Silverpoint, 25 x 21 in.[/caption]

Mark(ing) Time: Works on Paper Invitational consists of artwork by artists who work strictly on paper. Its aim is to explore the traditional and contemporary ideas of what constitutes drawing and printmaking. At the Dishman Art Museum (Beaumont, TX), where the exhibition opens on May 23, one can expect to see a full range of possibilities: from drawings by artists who work classically with graphite on paper to artists who expand the definition of working on paper to create entire installations. Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Aunt Helen's Doll—I is one of the show's many wonders. Opening reception: May 23, 6:30—8:30 p.m. The show continues through July 12, 2014.

[post_title] => The Possibilities of Paper at the Dishman Art Museum [post_excerpt] => Mark(ing) Time: Works on Paper Invitational is an exhibition of artwork by artists who work strictly on paper. Its aim is to explore the traditional and contemporary ideas of what constitutes drawing and printmaking. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dishman-art-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-21 11:34:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-21 15:34:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=10205 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9823 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-03-18 12:49:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-18 16:49:40 [post_content] => Postcards from the Edge is an annual AIDS benefit exhibition this year hosted by Luhring Augustine Gallery. Over twenty students from Sherry Camhy's classes donated 4 x 6 inch paintings for the event. Work is still available for purchase online at www.visualAIDS.org. [caption id="attachment_9829" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Postcards from the Edge Richard Husson, Portrait, 2013. Graphite on paper, 6 x 4 in.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9833" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Postcards from the Edge Sherry Camhy, Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 6 x 4 in.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9830" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Postcards from the Edge Ellen Wahl, Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 2013.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9831" align="aligncenter" width="660"]Postcards from the Edge Marvin Lindenthal, Kitten, 2013. Mixed media, 4 x 6 in.[/caption] [post_title] => Postcards from the Edge [post_excerpt] => Postcards from the Edge is an annual AIDS benefit exhibition this year hosted by Luhring Augustine Gallery. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => postcards-from-the-edge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-16 09:23:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-16 13:23:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=9823 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8248 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2014-01-07 07:00:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-07 12:00:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_8317" align="aligncenter" width="800"]drawing magazine silverpoint Wendy Shalen, Washed Ashore, 2008. Silverpoint on prepared paper, nylon fishing line, and skull, 25 x 32 in.[/caption] In the February 2014 issue of Drawing magazine, Jerry Weiss has a review of The Silverpoint Exhibition, a group show curated by Sherry Camhy, that included Wendy Shalen's Washed Ashore (above). Included in the issue is Camhy's "Setting Up for Silverpoint" in the Materials column. Interested in seeing more? The Silverpoint Exhibition of the National Arts Club catalogue is available through sherrycamhy.com. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy on Silverpoint in Drawing Magazine [post_excerpt] => In the February 2014 issue of Drawing magazine, Jerry Weiss has a review of The Silverpoint Exhibition, a group show curated by Sherry Camhy, which included Wendy Shalen's Washed Ashore. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => drawing-magazine-silverpoint [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-16 17:14:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-16 21:14:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=8248 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6374 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2013-11-18 09:28:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-18 14:28:32 [post_content] => Silverpoint is an old technique that involves drawing with sterling silver, gold, copper, and other precious metals on specially prepared surfaces. Long before graphite was discovered, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Albrecht Dürer used it. With silverpoint, the images whisper and shimmer on the surface with an elegant tone that glows and mellows as it tarnishes over time. Contemporary artists are rediscovering silverpoint’s beauty and exploring its potential. On December 4, the National Arts Club opens The Silverpoint Exhibition, which includes forty works I've curated from artists across the US and Canada, half of whom have studied at the Art Students League. The show continues through December 23, 2013.[portfolio_slideshow width="636" height="500" id="21333"]
Harvey Dinnerstein, Mercedes. Silverpoint on clay-coated surface, 20 x 20 in. Sherry Camhy, Innocence. Silverpoint on gray clayboard, 46 x 35 in. Burton Silverman, Model Resting. Silverpoint, 14 x 11 in. Maria Mottola, Breakfast. Silverpoint on paper, 6 x 9 in. Dan Thompson, Self-portrait. Silverpoint, 17 x 11 in. Costa Vavagiaskis, Maria XXI. Silverpoint on paper, 11 x 9 in. Katie Steiner, Annie. Silverpoint on clay-coated paper, 24 x 18 in. James E. Melone, East Hampton Mapping No. 4. Silverpoint, 4 x 6 in. Wendy Shalen, Washed Ashore. Silverpoint on prepared paper, 18 x 24 in. Ever Blanco, Wolf in Sheep's Clothing. Silverpoint, 22 x 22 in. Fioretti, Geraniums, Silver, Gold, Copper. Silverpoint, 24 x 19 in. Ephraim Rubenstein, Maddie Asleep. Silverpoint on prepared paper, 16 x 21 in. Richard Husson, Josephine's Tears. Silverpoint and colored pencil on tined and hand textured Masonite, 16 x 12 in. Evan Kitson, Self-portrait–Sick. Silverpoint on paper, 3 1/2 x 4 3/4 in. Sheldon Schultz, Unique. Silverpoint on prepared paper, 15 x 17 in. Blake Zoephel, Sunflowers (detail). Silverpoint on clay-coated paper, 22 x 22 in. Mary Grace Concannon, Intimations of His Immortality. Silverpoint on prepared clay coat paper, 9 x 6 in.
[post_title] => The Shimmer of Silverpoint [post_excerpt] => Silverpoint is an old technique that involves drawing with sterling silver, gold, copper, and other precious metals on specially prepared surfaces. Long before graphite was discovered, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Albrecht Dürer used it… [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => shimmer-of-silverpoint-art-journaling [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-26 15:59:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-26 19:59:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=6374 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6579 [post_author] => 45 [post_date] => 2013-10-21 12:00:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-21 16:00:04 [post_content] => Eye to I ... 3,000 Years of Portraits in the Beitzel and Righter Galleries at the Katonah Museum of Art presents sixty portraits accompanied by commentary about them by 100 contributors, "from a US poet laureate to a local police officer." A related show of 6 x 6 in. portraits includes the work of Sherry Camhy and twelve current and past students from her Art Students League drawing classes. The show opens October 27, 2013 and continues through February 16, 2014. You can click on an image for an enlarged popup slideshow.[portfolio_slideshow width="636" height="500" id="21325"]
Fioretti, Three Joeys, 2013. Pastel, 6 x 6 in. Michael Elsasser, Doug in Salulita, 2013. Graphite on clay board, 6 x 6 in. Sherry Camhy, Portrait, 2013. Graphite on paper, 6 x 6 in. Elizabeth Rothschild, Leo, 2013. Watercolor, 6 x 6 in. Joy Becker, Sofia, 2013. Oil on canvas, 6 x 6 in. Ever Blanco Valverde, Self-portrait, 2013. Silverpoint on prepared board, 6 x 6 in. Cathy Blake, Dmitry, 2013. Graphite, 6 x 6 in. Marie-Paule Martin, Self-portrait, 2013. Pencil, watercolor, and metallic, 6 x 6 in. Blake Zoephel, Jack in Hawaii, 2013. Oil, 6 x 6 in.
[post_title] => Petite Portraits [post_excerpt] => Eye to I ... 3,000 Years of Portraits at the Katonah Museum of Art presents sixty portraits accompanied by commentary about them by 100 contributors. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => katonah-art-museusm-portraits [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-26 15:51:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-26 19:51:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=6579 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6805 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-10-21 10:46:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-21 14:46:36 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_6808" align="aligncenter" width="660"]drawing graphite Sherry Camhy, Let There Be Light (detail), 2004. Graphite on paper.[/caption] Sherry Camhy's article "Painterly Graphite" appears in the Fall issue of Drawing Magazine. Take a video peek inside the issue. Available at bookstores and on newsstands November 5, 2013.
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  [post_title] => Sherry Camhy in Drawing Magazine [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's article "Painterly Graphite" appears in the Fall issue of Drawing magazine. Take a video peek inside the issue. Available at bookstores and on newsstands November 5, 2013. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => drawing-graphite [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-24 10:41:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-24 14:41:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=6805 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6558 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-10-02 13:23:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-02 17:23:54 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_6564" align="aligncenter" width="500"]silverpoint drawing Sherry Camhy, Aunt Helen's Doll–I, 2008. Silverpoint, 21 x 25.[/caption] Sherry Camhy's silverpoint drawing Aunt Helen's Doll is included in the newly published Strokes of Genius 5—The Best of Drawing: Design and Composition. Editor Rachel Rubin Wolf has selected 129 drawings by 91 artists who work in charcoal, pencil, pastel, colored pencil, scratch board, pen and ink, silverpoint, and other media. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy Award for Silverpoint Drawing [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy’s silverpoint drawing Aunt Helen’s Doll is included in the newly published Strokes of Genius 5—The Best of Drawing: Design and Composition. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => silverpoint-drawing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-22 10:57:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-22 14:57:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=6558 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4207 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-04-15 06:00:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-04-15 10:00:26 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_4219" align="aligncenter" width="660"]hammond museum Sherry Camhy, Sky, 2013. Graphite on paper, 3 x 7 ft.[/caption] Sherry Camhy's drawing Sky will be on exhibit in Elements at the Hammond Museum (North Salem, NY) from May 18 to June 8, 2013. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy at Hammond Museum [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's drawing Sky will be on exhibit in Elements at the Hammond Museum (North Salem, NY) from May 18 to June 8, 2013. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => hammond-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-30 12:40:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-30 16:40:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=4207 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2973 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-02-07 14:15:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-02-07 19:15:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2975" align="aligncenter" width="400"]art students league silverpoint Sherry Camhy, Innocence, 2004. Silverpoint on gray clay board, 46 x 35 in.[/caption] Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Innocence, currently on view in the ASL window, appears in Thea Burns's The Luminous Trace, Drawing and Writing in Metalpoint"In her carefully rendered full-length portraits," writes Burns, "Camhy has explored the soft, atmospheric, essentially painterly gradations of tone that metalpoint can produce even in large-scale images."   [post_title] => Sherry Camhy and Silverpoint Drawing [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Innocence, currently on view in the ASL window, appears in Thea Burns's The Luminous Trace, Drawing and Writing in Metalpoint. "In her carefully rendered full-length portraits," writes Burns, "Camhy has explored the soft, atmospheric, essentially painterly gradations of tone that metalpoint can produce even in large-scale images." [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => art-students-league-silverpoint [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-11 09:01:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-11 13:01:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=2973 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2507 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-01-21 08:24:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-21 13:24:18 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2567" align="aligncenter" width="506"]postcards from the edge sherry camhy Sherry Camhy, Lincoln,1865, 2013. Graphite, coffee on brown aged cardboard, 2012. 6 x 4 in.[/caption] Sherry Camhy and some artists in her classes—Jane Atlas, Joy Becker, Mary Grace Concannon, John Eiche, Joseph Fioretti, Arlene Goldsand, Richard Husson, Ivy Kienetsky, Carol Kravitz, Marvin Lindenthal, Marie-Paul Martin, Kellen, Mears, Julia Palfi, Rene Russel, Carol Savopoulos, Veronica Schliemann, Ever Bianco Valverde, and Joyce Weinstein—will be exhibiting work in Postcards from the Edge at the Sikkema Jenkins & Co., January 25–January 27, 2013.   [post_title] => Sherry Camhy and Students in Postcards from the Edge Benefit [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy and some artists in her classes will be exhibiting work in Postcards from the Edge at the Sikkema Jenkins & Co., January 25–January 27, 2013. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => postcards-from-the-edge-sherry-camhy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-24 17:23:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-24 21:23:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=2507 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2470 [post_author] => 36 [post_date] => 2013-01-03 12:53:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-03 17:53:43 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2484" align="aligncenter" width="539"]katonah museum Blake Zoephel, Sunset #1, 2012. Pastel on canvas, 6 x 6 in.[/caption] Sherry Camhy and her students—Mary Grace Concannon, John Eiche, Richard Husson, Sheryl Ann Liston, Julia Palfi, and Blake Zoephel—are exhibiting paintings in Small Works at the Katonah Museum of Art through February 10, 2013. [post_title] => Sherry Camhy [post_excerpt] => Sherry Camhy and her students are exhibiting paintings in Small Works at the Katonah Museum of Art through February 10, 2013. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => katonah-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-31 11:10:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-31 15:10:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.asllinea.org/?p=2470 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
  • Delacroix’s Devotion to Drawing

    While Delacroix might defy easy classification among art historical "isms," his lifelong devotion to drawing is certain.

  • Seven Secrets of Silverpoint

    Silverpoint/metalpoint was the Old Masters’ pencil before there were graphite pencils. These artists used the medium for delicate, detailed work, and for cartoons under frescos. Contemporary artists are exploring the medium because it is now easy to use, in any size and for many subjects.

  • Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman

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  • Sherry Camhy and Silverpoint: An Exhibition, Publication, and Workshop

    Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Portrait of Olivia is now on view at the Lyme Art Association Gallery as part of the 85th Annual Juried Exhibition of the Hudson Valley Art Association.

  • Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer

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  • Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection

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  • Hidden Treasures

    The Gilded Age of Drawing in America, now on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents three dozen remarkable and rarely seen drawings by artists, both famous and lesser known.

  • Advice for the Beginning Art Student

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  • Sherry Camhy in Upcoming Silverpoint Exhibition

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  • Art Students League Instructors in The Figurative Artist's Handbook

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  • Sherry Camhy's Madrid Workshop

    Sherry Camhy will be teaching a six-day workshop in Madrid this spring.

  • Sherry Camhy Participates in AIDS Benefit

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  • Spotlight on Ralph Alfred Blakelock

    Blakelock fought with his paint until his images magically evolved into the mystical, musical nocturnes of silence he sought.

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  • Sherry Camhy on Mechanical Pencils

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  • Sherry Camhy on Sketchbooks

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  • Back to the Drawing Board

    When I visit the Metropolitan Museum, I am able to travel back in time to communicate with artists living centuries ago, and ask them, How did you do that? Why did you do that?

  • 18th Annual Postcards from the Edge

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  • On Exhibition: A Celebration of Life Drawing

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  • Sherry Camhy's Online Gallery

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  • Sherry Camhy Is "Artist of the Month"

  • Becoming an Artist

    What does “becoming an artist” mean? Some people simply have an impulse to create. They are artists by nature. Some strive to become skilled artists and enjoy that quest for its own sake. Then there are artists who also want to share something they have created by exhibiting their work. Open juried exhibitions are a way to get started exhibiting your work publicly.

  • Sherry Camhy's Veritas

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  • Sherry Camhy on Pastel

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  • The Possibilities of Paper at the Dishman Art Museum

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  • Postcards from the Edge

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  • Sherry Camhy on Silverpoint in Drawing Magazine

    In the February 2014 issue of Drawing magazine, Jerry Weiss has a review of The Silverpoint Exhibition, a group show curated by Sherry Camhy, which included Wendy Shalen's Washed Ashore.

  • The Shimmer of Silverpoint

    Silverpoint is an old technique that involves drawing with sterling silver, gold, copper, and other precious metals on specially prepared surfaces. Long before graphite was discovered, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Albrecht Dürer used it…

  • Petite Portraits

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  • Sherry Camhy in Drawing Magazine

    Sherry Camhy's article "Painterly Graphite" appears in the Fall issue of Drawing magazine. Take a video peek inside the issue. Available at bookstores and on newsstands November 5, 2013.

  • Sherry Camhy Award for Silverpoint Drawing

    Sherry Camhy’s silverpoint drawing Aunt Helen’s Doll is included in the newly published Strokes of Genius 5—The Best of Drawing: Design and Composition.

  • Sherry Camhy at Hammond Museum

    Sherry Camhy's drawing Sky will be on exhibit in Elements at the Hammond Museum (North Salem, NY) from May 18 to June 8, 2013.

  • Sherry Camhy and Silverpoint Drawing

    Sherry Camhy's silverpoint Innocence, currently on view in the ASL window, appears in Thea Burns's The Luminous Trace, Drawing and Writing in Metalpoint. "In her carefully rendered full-length portraits," writes Burns, "Camhy has explored the soft, atmospheric, essentially painterly gradations of tone that metalpoint can produce even in large-scale images."

  • Sherry Camhy and Students in Postcards from the Edge Benefit

    Sherry Camhy and some artists in her classes will be exhibiting work in Postcards from the Edge at the Sikkema Jenkins & Co., January 25–January 27, 2013.

  • Sherry Camhy

    Sherry Camhy and her students are exhibiting paintings in Small Works at the Katonah Museum of Art through February 10, 2013.